Pressure Cooker Hot Water Test- Pressure Cooking School

pressure cooking school  Welcome to Pressure Cooking School!
 This article is part of Lesson 1: Getting Acquainted

Pressure Cooker Evaporation - Pressure Cooking SchoolSo, let’s try it out! We’re going to do a “Hot Water Test” – basically, we’re pressure cooking water. It’s a great way to see how the pressure cooker reaches pressure, maintains pressure and releases pressure.

I like to do a hot water test with 4 cups (1L) of water.  I use a specific amount of water so that I can see after the test how much water evaporated during pressure cooking.

Measuring the liquid dramatically illustrates just how little of your recipe’s liquid will evaporate from the pressure cooker. I’ve tested this myself and measured it and here’s what I found: If your boil an un-covered pot of water for 10-minutes about a cup (250ml) of that liquid will evaporate. But, if you pressure cook that water for 10 minutes, less than a tablespoon will evaporate. That’s a big difference!

This little bit of knowledge will be useful for you later, as you convert your own recipes to use in the pressure cooker (you’ll need to adjust the liquid level).

Trouble-shooting

The Hot Water Test is also a great tool for trouble-shooting.  As you get on with the business of pressure cooking and experimenting with new recipes, there might be times when the pressure cooker isn’t acting quite right.  When that is the case, you’ll want to find out if the recipe is giving your pressure cooker grief or if there is actually something wrong with the pressure cooker.  Pressure cooking only water eliminates one possible cause of mischief from the equation.

It’s been my experience that in most cases, it’s usually the recipe.  So, if everything is working fine with just pressure cooking water, then you’ll know who the offender is.  If, instead, the problem persists even with pressure cooking water then it’s time to investigate further – you can always post a request in the forums for help.

Pressure Cooker Hot Water Test - Pressure Cooking School

I like to do a hot water test with 4 cups (1L) of water.  I use a specific amount of water so that I can see after the test how much water evaporated during pressure cooking. This little bit of knowledge will be useful for you later, as you convert your own recipes to use in the pressure cooker (you’ll need to adjust the liquid level).

But for now, let’s just see how it works…. while we walk through the Hot Water Test, together.

CONTINUE…


pressure cooking schoolCONTINUE Lesson 1: Getting Acquainted:

Pressure Cooker Hot Water Test - to try out or troubleshoot