Pressure Cooker White Rice
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Pressure Cooker White Rice

Who needs a rice cooker when you can get perfect results from the pressure cooker!  Here, we show you two ways to steam rice perfectly: The classic way, right in the pot that usually works for most pressure cookers; and, the Bain Marie way, also called pan in pot, for troublesome pressure cooker/cooktop combinations or to create a one-pot meal (like in our chickpea curry and brown rice one pot).

Grains, and in particular rice, demand precise amounts of time and liquid for perfect pressure cooker results. Too much of either of these will get you soupy gummy rice… really fast. Too little will result in little inedible hard or carbonized rocks.

It’s important to note that some of that cooking time is actually taking place during the natural release.  The rice continues to cook in the residual heat, steam, and pressure in the cooker.  Don’t be impatient and release all of the pressure right after the cooking time is up!  Each rice variety has its own time and liquid requirements which are listed in the table below.

Dry Basmati Rice

Pressure Cooker Rice Pressure Cooking Times & Liquid Ratios

Rice Typeliquid per
1 cup (250ml)
rice
IP MINI
/ELECTRIC
pressure
cooker
(9-10psi/70kpa)
INSTANTPOT
/ELECTRIC
pressure
cooker
(11-12psi/80kpa)
stovetop
pressure
cooker
(13-15psi/100kpa)
pressure
selection
opening
method
Arborio Rice (risotto)2 cups (500 ml)557High or LowSlow Normal
Basmati Rice1 1/2 cups (375 ml)333High or Low10-Min. Natural
Basmati Rice (rinsed)1 1/4 cups (315 ml)111High or Low10-Min. Natural
Basmati Rice (soaked)1 cup (250 ml)111High or Low10-Min. Natural
Black Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Brown Rice1 1/4 cups (315 ml)222018High10-Min. Natural
Cargo Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Carnaroli Rice
(see Arborio Rice)
Forbidden Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Jasmine Rice (rinsed)1 cup (250 ml)111High or Low10-Min. Natural
Jasmine Rice (un-rinsed)1 1/4 cup (312 ml)111High or Low10-Min. Natural
Parboiled Rice (Uncle Ben's)1 1/2 cups (375 ml)555High or LowSlow Normal
Red Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Risotto
(see Arborio Rice)
Romano Rice2 1/4 (560 ml)555High or Low10-Min. Natural
Sushi Rice (rinsed)1 1/2 (375 ml)777High or Low5-Min. Natural
White long-grain Rice1 1/2 cups (375 ml)333High or Low10-Min. Natural
White short-grain Rice 1 1/2 cups (375 ml)888High or LowSlow Normal
Wild Rice3 cups (750 ml)302520HighNatural
Rice cooking times are mainly the same for both stovetop and electric pressure cookers, the only exception is for very dense grains.
NOTE: Although the measurements are in cups (equivalent to 8 oz. or 250ml), the quantities can be measured using any vessel, such as a glass or mug. What is important is that the ratio of grain to liquid stay within the recommendations. Cooking time does not increase with quantity – so 1 cup or 2 cups of rice will require the same pressure cooking time.

Classic Pressure Cooker Steamed Rice

Just add the ingredients directly in the pressure cooker and go.

Pressure Cooker Accessories Pr. Cook Time Pr. Level Open
4 L or larger none 3 min. High(2) 10-min. Natural

4.8 from 17 reviews
Pressure Cooker White Rice
 
Author: 
Recipe type: pressure cooker
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Never fill the pressure cooker more than half-way with grains and cooking liquid.
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 cup (250 ml) long grain white rice (such as Basmati)
  • 1½ cups (375 ml) Water (or vegetable liquid)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil (or butter) -optional
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. To the pressure cooker add the rice, water and oil.
  2. Close and lock the lid of the pressure cooker.
  3. For electric pressure cookers: Cook for 3 minutes at high pressure.
    For stove top pressure cookers: Turn the heat up to high and when the cooker indicates it has reached high pressure, lower to the heat to maintain it and begin counting 3 minutes pressure cooking time.
  4. When time is up, open the pressure cooker with the 10-minute Natural release method - move the cooker off the burner and do not remove the lid. Instead, count 10 minutes for the contents to finish cooking and steaming using the cooker's residual heat. For electric pressure cookers, when cooking time is up count 10 minutes of natural open time. Then, release the rest of the pressure using the valve.
  5. Fluff with a fork and serve.

Bain Marie Pressure Cooker Steamed Rice

With this method, the rice is actually steamed in a heat-proof dish which is then placed inside the pressure cooker. This method is particularly useful when pressure cooking something that you’ll be serving with rice – as in this pressure cooker brown rice and chickpea curry recipe.  Or, rarely,  to compensate for a low-quality pressure cooker or a particularly strong heat source that consistently results in burned rice using the classic method.

Pressure Cooker Accessories Pr. Cook Time Pr. Level Open
6 L or larger steamer basket, heat-proof bowl 3 min. High(2) 10-min. Natural

4.8 from 17 reviews
Pressure Cooker White Rice - Bain Marie Method
 
Author: 
Recipe type: pressure cooker
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Never fill the pressure cooker more than half-way with grains and cooking liquid.
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 cup (250 ml) long grain white rice (such as Basmati)
  • 1½ cups (375 ml) water
  • 1 teaspoon oil (or butter) - optional
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Prepare the pressure cooker by adding 1 cup of water, or the minimum required by the cooker to maintain pressure. Then, lower the steamer basket into the cooker.
  2. To the heat-proof bowl add the rice, water and oil.
  3. Lower the un-covered bowl onto the steamer basket in the pressure cooker.
  4. Close and lock the lid of the pressure cooker.
  5. For electric pressure cookers: Cook for 3 minutes at high pressure.
    For stove top pressure cookers: Turn the heat up to high and when the cooker indicates it has reached high pressure, lower to the heat to maintain it and begin counting 3 minutes pressure cooking time.
  6. When time is up, open the pressure cooker with the 10-minute Natural release method - move the cooker off the burner and do not remove the lid. Instead, count 10 minutes for the contents to finish cooking and steaming using the cooker's residual heat. For electric pressure cookers, when cooking time is up count 10 minutes of natural open time. Then, release the rest of the pressure using the valve.
  7. Remove the heat-proof bowl from the pressure cooker, fluff with a fork and serve.

Pressure Cooker steamed RicePRESSURE COOKER Steamed Rice

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175 Comments

  1. Re the option “high or low” when cooking Jasmine rice: if, like me, you have an induction stove, selecting high vs low pressure *does* make a difference. I normally cook my rinsed Jasmine rice on high pressure; tonight, on a whim, I chose low. Used the same cooking time and natural release as always, and the rice turned out to be a bit on the crunchy side. (We still ate it.)
    So, I conclude that if your stove is quick with the temperature changes (like an induction stove is), you might be better off either selecting high pressure for rice, or, if using low pressure, lenthening cooking time.

    1. Anette, the Natural Release from low pressure will be shorter than the one from high pressure. Next time, use the 10-min Natural and keep the lid closed even if the pressure indicator has come down – as the rice keeps on cooking during that time. ; )

      Ciao,

      L

      1. Did that (I always do) but it didn’t help. No biggie – just a data point.

        (Btw, the setting notifying me of new responses doesn’t seem to work. I had this problem with my Instant Pot question the other day, too.)

  2. Thanks for this.
    I found that I preferred the results of the Bain Marie method for Basmati rice and I also appreciated the easier clean-up (smaller bowl).
    Only minor glitch was that it was as awkward to get the bowl I happened to have (no handle) out of the pressure cooker as I expected. Could you recommend a source for the type of bowl shown in the picture (i.e., with a handle going over the top that’d allow using some utensil to pull it out)
    Thanks,
    Jon

    1. Hi John, you can find links to purchase similar containers to the one pictured in this article at the bottom of this page:
      https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooker-accessory-forms-and-molds/

      Ciao,

      L

    2. Hello, Jon — I use a sling under the pot/bowl/dish I use for P.I.P. You can make one out of heavy weight aluminum foil by cutting off two 24″ pieces of foil, folding each piece in either thirds or in half twice (width-wise) so that your pieces are still 24″ long. Cross the two strips over each other and staple where they cross about four times. Voila – a sling. The other option is to buy a silicone sling online. I now have one. I had to trim it so it would fit my 6-qt. Ultra, but it works great. It kind of grabs the bowl, too. No matter what, use caution. Hope this helps.

  3. Hi Laura:
    I had great results with “pot in pot” method when I forgot to rinse my Basmati rice, but after I rinsed a batched and used 1.25 cups water for every 1 cup rice, rice came out less cooked than I’d like and yet there’s still extra unabsorbed water in the pot.
    (I always thought you’re supposed to rinse Basmati.) Do you have any advice on best approach with these seeming contradictory results?
    (I note that you say nothing about adding salt–could that help?)
    Thanks,
    Jon

    1. Jon, it depends on the culture that is preparing the rice and the country in which the rice was dried and packaged – some countries spray vitamins on rice to make it more nutritious and it shouldn’t be rinsed. Even the use of the rice will depend on whether you rinse it or not – for example, you would never rinse Arborio since you want to keep the surface starch to make risotto creamy.

      I have not tested PIP rinsed Basmati – maybe it needs and even lower liquid ratio. What’s important to understand that with this method part of the cooking comes from the pressurized steam on the surface. Maybe there was too much liquid and the steam only cooked the water above the rice. Water heated by steam is at a lower temperature than water cooked in the base of the pressure cooker. So, my guess is that maybe that’s why your rice was watery and under-cooked.

      Personally, I like my Basmati a little “sticky” so I don’t rinse it. : )

      Ciao,

      L

      1. Hi Laura,
        Could you please test rinsed and even soaked basmati rice… All I’m willing to achieve is a basmati al dente, separate (not sticky or broken), fluffy (but not soft or mushy) with just enough moisture.
        I don’t like it a little “sticky” so I always rice it. Just made 210 gr of basmati x 250 – minus 3 TB – of water because I had rinsed it and soaked it for 20 minutes trying to get rid of he starch…, 1/2 tsp of sea salt, 1 minute High+10 min NR and it came out OK, but not perfect!! Thanks!!

        1. Marilyn, I already tested rinsed and soaked Basmati rice, you can see the indications in the timing chart. If you’re not satisfied with my recommendations, you can always reduce the cooking liquid. But try what I’ve already tested, first. I think you’ll like it. : )

          Ciao,

          L

  4. Thanks for the recipe.
    Going to make this in the upcoming days.

  5. Any of these comments would be helpful if there were some explanation with your terms. Pressure cooking time. Natural real ease. Realease pressire but don’t open pressure cooker. Sorry just a dad with no cooking experience trying to figure this out with no explanation. I have a really old pressure cooker and was trying to follow a suggestion to use it to cook perfect rice. I guess you have to learn somehow

    1. Bradley, read your cooker’s instruction manual. Learn to use it be pressure cooking water first. All this will slowly make sense once you’ve got a handle on how to use your pressure cooker.

      Since everyone’s cooker operates differently, this website and recipes cannot go into more detail on how to operate your specific cooker. Sorry.

      Don’t give up. You only have to learn how to use your cooker once. : )

      Ciao,

      L

  6. Hi!
    I’ve just acquired a King Pro (6 litre) – my first pressure cooker and I’m struggling with basmati rice – any guidance would be much appreciated
    Thanks!

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