Pressure Cooker White Rice
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Pressure Cooker White Rice

Who needs a rice cooker when you can get perfect results from the pressure cooker!  Here, we show you two ways to steam rice perfectly: The classic way, right in the pot that usually works for most pressure cookers; and, the Bain Marie way, also called pan in pot, for troublesome pressure cooker/cooktop combinations or to create a one-pot meal (like in our chickpea curry and brown rice one pot).

Grains, and in particular rice, demand precise amounts of time and liquid for perfect pressure cooker results. Too much of either of these will get you soupy gummy rice… really fast. Too little will result in little inedible hard or carbonized rocks.

It’s important to note that some of that cooking time is actually taking place during the natural release.  The rice continues to cook in the residual heat, steam, and pressure in the cooker.  Don’t be impatient and release all of the pressure right after the cooking time is up!  Each rice variety has its own time and liquid requirements which are listed in the table below.

Dry Basmati Rice

Pressure Cooker Rice Pressure Cooking Times & Liquid Ratios

Rice Typeliquid per
1 cup (250ml)
rice
INSTANTPOT
/ELECTRIC
pressure
cooker
(10-12psi)
stovetop
pressure
cooker
(13-15psi)
pressure
selection
opening
method
Arborio Rice (risotto)2 cups (500 ml)57High or LowSlow Normal
Basmati Rice1 1/2 cups (375 ml)33High or Low10-Min. Natural
Basmati Rice (rinsed)1 1/4 cups (315 ml)11High or Low10-Min. Natural
Basmati Rice (soaked)1 cup (250 ml)11High or Low10-Min. Natural
Black Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Brown Rice1 1/4 cups (315 ml)2018High10-Min. Natural
Cargo Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Carnaroli Rice
(see Arborio Rice)
Forbidden Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Jasmine Rice (rinsed)1 cup (250 ml)11High or Low10-Min. Natural
Jasmine Rice (un-rinsed)1 1/4 cup (312 ml)11High or Low10-Min. Natural
Parboiled Rice (Uncle Ben's)1 1/2 cups (375 ml)55High or LowSlow Normal
Red Rice
(see Brown Rice)
Risotto
(see Arborio Rice)
Romano Rice2 1/4 (560 ml)55High or Low10-Min. Natural
Sushi Rice (rinsed)1 1/2 (375 ml)77High or Low5-Min. Natural
White long-grain Rice1 1/2 cups (375 ml)33High or Low10-Min. Natural
White short-grain Rice 1 1/2 cups (375 ml)88High or LowSlow Normal
Wild Rice3 cups (750 ml)2520HighNatural
Rice cooking times are mainly the same for both stovetop and electric pressure cookers, the only exception is for very dense grains.
NOTE: Although the measurements are in cups (equivalent to 8 oz. or 250ml), the quantities can be measured using any vessel, such as a glass or mug. What is important is that the ratio of grain to liquid stay within the recommendations. Cooking time does not increase with quantity – so 1 cup or 2 cups of rice will require the same pressure cooking time.

Classic Pressure Cooker Steamed Rice

Just add the ingredients directly in the pressure cooker and go.

Pressure Cooker Accessories Pr. Cook Time Pr. Level Open
4 L or larger none 3 min. High(2) 10-min. Natural

4.7 from 13 reviews
Pressure Cooker White Rice
 
Author: 
Recipe type: pressure cooker
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Never fill the pressure cooker more than half-way with grains and cooking liquid.
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 cup (250 ml) long grain white rice (such as Basmati)
  • 1½ cups (375 ml) Water (or vegetable liquid)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil (or butter) -optional
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. To the pressure cooker add the rice, water and oil.
  2. Close and lock the lid of the pressure cooker.
  3. For electric pressure cookers: Cook for 3 minutes at high pressure.
    For stove top pressure cookers: Turn the heat up to high and when the cooker indicates it has reached high pressure, lower to the heat to maintain it and begin counting 3 minutes pressure cooking time.
  4. When time is up, open the pressure cooker with the 10-minute Natural release method - move the cooker off the burner and do not remove the lid. Instead, count 10 minutes for the contents to finish cooking and steaming using the cooker's residual heat. For electric pressure cookers, when cooking time is up count 10 minutes of natural open time. Then, release the rest of the pressure using the valve.
  5. Fluff with a fork and serve.

Bain Marie Pressure Cooker Steamed Rice

With this method, the rice is actually steamed in a heat-proof dish which is then placed inside the pressure cooker. This method is particularly useful when pressure cooking something that you’ll be serving with rice – as in this pressure cooker brown rice and chickpea curry recipe.  Or, rarely,  to compensate for a low-quality pressure cooker or a particularly strong heat source that consistently results in burned rice using the classic method.

Pressure Cooker Accessories Pr. Cook Time Pr. Level Open
6 L or larger steamer basket, heat-proof bowl 3 min. High(2) 10-min. Natural

4.7 from 13 reviews
Pressure Cooker White Rice - Bain Marie Method
 
Author: 
Recipe type: pressure cooker
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Never fill the pressure cooker more than half-way with grains and cooking liquid.
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 cup (250 ml) long grain white rice (such as Basmati)
  • 1½ cups (375 ml) water
  • 1 teaspoon oil (or butter) - optional
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Prepare the pressure cooker by adding 1 cup of water, or the minimum required by the cooker to maintain pressure. Then, lower the steamer basket into the cooker.
  2. To the heat-proof bowl add the rice, water and oil.
  3. Lower the un-covered bowl onto the steamer basket in the pressure cooker.
  4. Close and lock the lid of the pressure cooker.
  5. For electric pressure cookers: Cook for 3 minutes at high pressure.
    For stove top pressure cookers: Turn the heat up to high and when the cooker indicates it has reached high pressure, lower to the heat to maintain it and begin counting 3 minutes pressure cooking time.
  6. When time is up, open the pressure cooker with the 10-minute Natural release method - move the cooker off the burner and do not remove the lid. Instead, count 10 minutes for the contents to finish cooking and steaming using the cooker's residual heat. For electric pressure cookers, when cooking time is up count 10 minutes of natural open time. Then, release the rest of the pressure using the valve.
  7. Remove the heat-proof bowl from the pressure cooker, fluff with a fork and serve.

Pressure Cooker steamed RicePRESSURE COOKER Steamed Riceip-smart recipe script (what’s this?)

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159 Comments

  1. Thanks!

  2. Hi!! I see brown rice and Basmati rice but nothing in Brown basmati. I soaked mine and then I used 1 1/4 per cup of water per 1 cup of rice cooked for 3 minutes and did a natural release Keith my electric . Seemed to be a tad undercooked but still edible. What times would you recommend for me with the soaking for 15 minutes and 10 mi nutrition drain then cook? Thank you!!! By the way I’m going to have to go buy another book because I’m wearing out the pages on my first one! HA!!

    1. Christine, the brown rice cooking times work for all brown rices – no matter the kind. We have not completed our tests for soaked brown rice cooking times. You should not use white rice cooking time for brown, tho. : )

      Ciao,

      L

      1. Thank you!!!

  3. I made this today, Jasmine Rice – Bahn Marie method it is perfect!!!! I hope my red beans turn out just as good.

  4. Cooked brown rice for the first time today at “bagno Maria”, came out delicious.
    Grazie mille

  5. I seldom make rice, but when I do, it’s just for two of us and I don’t want extra or leftovers. Is it possible to cut the amounts in half, or will the rice get stuck to the bottom of the pot?

    1. Mary, if halving the recipe does not go below your pressure cooker’s minimum liquid requirement you don’t need to change anything. If it does, use the second, Bain Marie, method to make as little rice as you like. : )

      Ciao,

      L

  6. Thank you for the PIP instructions I reduced by half and it came out PERFECT.

  7. I am looking for a simple rice pudding recipie for the instant pot. Anyone have a one step easy method?

    1. How do you make a rice pudding in one step? I’d like to know, too!

      Meanwhile, here is my 10-step recipe:
      https://www.hippressurecooking.com/arborio-rice-pudding-with-mandarin-coins-amaretto-cookie-crumbs-and-thyme/

      Ciao,

      L

    2. Our stovetop rice pudding is very simple, but does use a double boiler. Everything goes in at once (no eggs, its not a custard). We use milk n cooked rice with raisins n cinnamon. That is rice pudding to Americans. Its served with butter, brown sugar n milk…or no butter n use cream w/the brn sugar.
      Probably a PIP would work in the IP.
      Some ppl top with sliced almonds too.

  8. I have a Farberware pressure cooker. Many recipes I’m seeing state to cook on High or Low. I don’t have that setting on my pressure cooker. Any suggestions?

    1. Becki, your Farberware only pressure cooks at “high” pressure – if you want to do a “low” pressure cooker recipe, halve the recommended pressure cooking time.

      Ciao,

      L

  9. Do you change anything if you are using broth instead of water? I used the bean cooking water from some black beans I had just prepared and it came out great.

    It was rinsed long grain rice, which wasn’t on the list, so I split the difference between rinsed basmati and white long grain, using 2.75 cups for 2 cups of rice. (I just got my pressure cooker and I feel so liberated cooking that much rice at once! I don’t now anybody who likes to pile on the rice as much as I do.)

    Another question: do you have a similar list for cooking rinsed red quinoa? I assume it matches one of the items on this list, but not sure which.

    Thanks! This is such a great resource!

    1. Bud, as you found out, you can use any liquid to replace water and it will work just fine.

      The full list of pressure cooking times (that includes quinoa) can be found here:
      https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/

      There is no difference in cooking time between white, red or black quinoa. Here are some of the recipes that I’ve made with it..
      https://www.hippressurecooking.com/category/ingredient/grains/quinoa/

      Enjoy and welcome!

      Ciao,

      L

  10. Hi Laura,
    I use arborio rice and I like my rice to be separate and fluffy like in the pictures above. As I didn’t want it to be sticky like risotto, I used the times for white short grain rice (8 minutes, high pressure, slow normal release in 6 minutes) in my electric pressure cooker. It came up sticky like risotto and gummy. Is it better for me to increse the cooking time (maybe to 9mins.) or switch to 10min. natural release?

    Thanks!

    1. Arborio is intended to be sticky. You could try rinsing it to death to remove as much surface starch as possible. That will help. Cooking longer will just make it softer and gummier.

      But all in all, you would be better off switching to a rice like basmati or jasmine that is intended to be separate and fluffy. You still need to rinse though. In general, basmati from Pakistan is better than basmati from pretty much anywhere else. Although as with everything, you get what you pay for. I am still working on jasmine, but I am not sure that Thai jasmine rice is worth the premium.

    2. For separate, fluffy rice, use a long grain variety like basmati or jasmine. It’s nice to have both a long and short varieties around for different uses.

  11. Can I use a Corningware or classic porcelain souflee type dish for the bain marie method? Or does it have to be a metal dish?

    1. I would love to know this too!

  12. Hi, Thank you for an awesome site
    I have WMF PC. I have followed basmati recipe, (several times)but after 3 min at HP and then just turning the stovetop.of, letting it release slow, it still is not done. It needs at least 5 min. Trying to troubleshoot.. Rice is good quality double diamond brand, that I just bought. Could therebe something wrong with the pressure indicator, that is that it shows pressure an really is not?
    Please advice
    Kind regards
    Mat z

    1. Matz, my rice recipes require the 10-minute release. Your cooker likely loses pressure with the natural release in LESS than 10 minutes. When that is the case, keep the lid closed for the full 10 minutes after cooking – the rice will continue to steam and cook during that time.

      Make sure the lid is well cleaned, and do a water test bringing the cooker up to pressure. When it reaches high pressure tap on the indicator very lightly to see if there is resistance. If there is, your indicator is fine. : )

      Ciao,

      L

      1. Thank you very much :)

        Best wishes for the holidays and happy new year!

        M atz

  13. I’m wondering what cooking time the rice you use in these recipes would have in a normal (no-pressure-cooking) stovetop cooking manner. I’m from the Netherlands and most rice is quickcooking, so it’s ready in 8 to 10 minutes (and resting another 10 minutes). So I’m trying to figure out what rice I could use in the Instant Pot using this helpful information :-)

    1. Is quick-cooking the same as parboiled? There is an entry for parboiled rice in the chart – it is actually one of two that don’t need a resting time when cooked under pressure (the other being risotto rice).

      Ciao,

      L

      1. Thanks for your reply Laura. It’s not exactly the same, but it might work if I use the method for parboiled rice.
        I would also really like to know what the ‘normal’ (stovetop) cookingtimes of other types of rice are, like basmati rice. I can find it here in organic shops, and then it has to be cooked (stovetop) somewhere between 30 and 60 minutes. Is that comparable with what’s used in recipes?

        1. I’m sorry, I don’t understand the question. Are you talking about brown or whole grain basmati? For all “whole” rice (no matter the variety) the same pressure cooking time will work. For white rice, there is a cooking time and ratio for nearly every type.

          Ciao,

          L

  14. Hi Laura,
    I’ve a question on the Rice timings. You’ve indicated the timing of 250ml of long grain rice to 375ml of water in an electric pressure cooker at 3 min cook and 10 min natural release.
    Are the timings per weight, ie if I used 500ml of rice with 750ml water would I then cook the rice for 6 minuets?

    1. Stephen, the pressure cooking time does not change. Each rice kernel needs the same amount of time no matter how many of them there are. : )

      Ciao,

      L

      1. Molte Grazie Laura.

    2. Stephen, the timings are not by weight they are by volume ratio. If you increase the recipe you would keep to the same ratios but the pressure cooking time does not change – as each grain of rice will still take the same amount of time to be perfectly cooked (no matter how many of them there are). I discuss this in more detail in the Pressure Cooking school -specifically the episode with the mashed potatoes, in the segment about doubling and halving recipes (though I recommend watching all the lessons ;).

      Just pretend I’m holding a grain of rice, instead of a potato, in the video. : )
      https://www.hippressurecooking.com/halve-or-double-pcs/

      Ciao,

      L

  15. I’m wondering when to use the rice button on my instant pot… The perfect Jasmine rice recipe that was in the cookbook that came with the pressure cooker didn’t mention the button at all. It said to set the cooking time for 4 minutes but the rice button automatically set it for 12. I don’t usually make rice so I’d appreciate any help.

    1. Hi Susan, manufacturers and cooks differ on how much time, pressure and water is needed to make rice. So, cookers will have a “rice” function but it may require too much time or too much liquid, or too much pressure to properly make rice. The time and pressure noted in this recipe is my method for getting “perfect” rice, and it does not use the rice button. It uses the “manual” or “pressure cook” button (according to your model).

      I hope this helps!

      Ciao,

      L

      1. Hey Susan, My Instant Pot has a Rice function too and I’ve found the following may help.
        The Pot has a Plus (+) & (-) buttons for altering the times. When I select the rice function the “12” (minutes) flashes for a certain period of time, at this point I use the – button to decrease the time down to 3 minutes.
        I hope this helps, I cooked rice in my instant pot using Laura’s method for the first time on Boxing Day and,.. after years of failing to get to get perfect rice – even buying a Rice Cooker,..
        I got perfect fluffy rice.

        1. Thank you both for your responses! They were very helpful. Have a Happy New Year!

    2. Hey Susan forgot to say.
      Just use Laura’s measurements when weighing the Rice out. You might be interested in my question to Laura above.

  16. Hi Laura! In your book, “hip Pressure Cooking” – which I just bought – your recipe for “Perfect White Rice” calls for 1 1/2 cups long grain white rice to 3 cups water for all pressure cookers, including electric ones. However the recipe *here* doesn’t show that ratio, or in the appendix in the book. Is it a misprint or is that a different recipe? Thanks!

  17. I have a larger-sized stovetop pressure cooker but was looking at getting a dedicated rice cooker and thought to myself, well, why don’t I just get one of those smaller 3 quart instant pots? Then I could use it for more stuff. I want my kids (teens) to be able to hit the button and make brown rice before I get home so dinner is on the table faster. Or if it’s programmable, then I could set it, and it would be ready when I get home. So, that would mean the brown rice would have been soaking all day and I should use those time settings? (And does this sound like a good investment?? I just want to start making brown rice in less than 50 minutes!)

  18. I’ve made rice in a rice cooker before and always add salt to the pot. I’ve noticed since getting an electric pressure cooker that no salt is ever added in recipes for rice. Is there a reason?

    1. Yes, for some not-yet-clear reason when you pressure cook rice with salt, it seems to sputter out of the valve. I have not been able to find a reasonable explanation for this so I can’t even guess as to the “why”.

      Ciao,

      L

  19. I am trying the Instant Pot for rice for the first time. I have osteopenia, so I always soak 1 cup of brown rice. I am trying jasmine brown rice and then later I’ll try forbidden rice and another time brown basmati rice. Could you tell me the ratio and time for those? Looks like you have only soaked white jasmine and that would be much different.

    1. Suzanne, I still have not tested soaking brown rice. However, the ratios and cooking times for dry black, red, green and brown of any rice variety are always despite the variety of whole rice being used. I hope that helps a little bit!

      Ciao,

      L

  20. I need to soak all grains and beans to try to decrease the phytates because I have osteopenia. The phytates bind to minerals which isn’t good. So I soaked 1 cup brown jasmine rice for 12 hours, dumped the soak water, added 1 cup fresh water. Then put the Instant Pot on manual for 10 minutes and let pressure decrease naturally. It seemed fine to me, but I would appreciate verification that this worked for others.

  21. Is the cooking time for short grain brown rice the same as the “brown” rice time listed in your chart? My experience is that short grain rice takes longer to cook than long grain.

    1. Yes, the time is the same. What variety short-grain brown did you pressure cook? In Italy we have a very-short grain brown rice, Originario, and it comes out just fine!

      Ciao,

      L

  22. I’m still getting used to my IP. I’ve cooked rice twice, once (1 cup basmati rice) using the settings in the book (4 minutes), which came out great and once (3 cups white rice) using the “Rice” button on my cooker (which sets to 10 minutes and can’t be changed), which gave me very sticky mushy rice. I always rinse my rice, regardless what kind I’m using.
    Thank you.

    1. Edith, try the recommended times and ratios on this page. When rice is rinsed, the water to pressure cook it is reduced. ; )

      Ciao,

      L

  23. i live in Canada. What kind of utensils would you recommend for Bain Marie? I have two IPs one mini and one ultra 6Q.

    I have had bad luck with rice in the IP.. About to give up . I have tried Basmati and also Brown rice
    . (Diamond brand California type) and always perfect in my regular rice cooker which is on its way out because it sheds Teflon. I need to get it right.

  24. HI I just purchased the 8qt pot and am wondering if I can make larger amounts of long grain white rice? I wanted to do 8 cups of rice, so I’d do 1.5 cups of water per cup of rice, but would I just hit the “rice” setting button? Or do I need to do it manually under pressure cook? Thanks!

    1. No matter the size, no pressure cooker can be filled more than half-way with rice and cooking liquid. Your 8-quart can make a maximum of 5.25 of dry white rice – which is 10 1/2 servings. For more details on filling guidelines, take a look at this page:
      https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooker-capacity-faq-if-it-fits-cook-it/

      Ciao,

      L

  25. The steamed method (bain marie) produces perfect rice when I’ve tried it, better than boiled rice in a saucepan.

    A suggestion Laura: for all recipes with natural release along with the 10 minutes standing, maybe change the wording to make it clear that the lid stays on the pressure cooker for the whole 10 minutes – even if the pressure has dropped and the lid is ready to open sooner. The way it’s worded at the moment implies the natural release can take 10 minutes, rather than saying to wait 10 minutes (even when the lid is ready to open sooner, to leave the lid on for the full 10 minutes). Hope this helps. :)

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