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  • #25631
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    My sous vide (AP) circulator started fluctuating =/- 5 degrees and beeping every few minutes when it went through the setpoint. Support agreed to replace it when I shipped mine back.
    I haven’t done this yet due to having the flu and not able to spend much time away from the bathroom but they shipped it anyway. Gotta love that.
    Hopefully I can send mine back to them next week.

    #25632
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I’ll second the thumbs up on their support. My A-1 stopped working. I contacted support and they asked for supporting evidence. Quite reasonable as shipping costs meant they were going to waive the return requirement. It stated working again while I was gathering the evidence and I told them so. They shipped me a new one anyway.

    #28847
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Helen and Greg, I’m putting together a quick-reference temperature chart to include in the Instant Pot SMART review and since Sous Vide is not my forte’ (actually I still haven’t tried it) I was wondering if there was a handful of default recommended temperatures and times to include.

    I don’t want to do anything exhaustive just a few rules of thumb such as meat x hours/minutes at x temperature.

    Thanks!

    Ciao,

    L

    #28858
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hi Laura, You can do a lot worse than follow the ChefSteps cheat sheet https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-time-and-temperature-guide I am moving to pre sear on steaks. I find it adds flavour. Actually, I often do a post sear as well out of habit. And my personal preference is for 55°C for steak. 66° for sausages. 65° for chicken breast. I have also taken to reheating my curry take aways @63° Salmon steaks @50° Timing, as the chart indicates, is far from critical. And as with the PC is very much dependent on the thickness of the cut. I cook salmon for 15 minutes unless I am cooking from frozen (as I usually am). Then I add 20-30 minutes on for defrosting before cooking. Because food passes through the danger zone much faster than defrosting first, it is actually much safer to cook direct from frozen. I usually put steak and sausages on for about an hour from frozen. But don’t worry if I don’t get to them for two. Chicken breast, which I usually do as a roulade, so much thicker, I do for about 1.5 hours. Again from frozen. I tend to make a batch of them and toss them straight in the freezer. They come out one at a time over the next month or so. Then move on to something else for a couple of months.

    Then there are the “tough” cuts. Times stretch out to days for them. But you can have medium rare, super tender and juicy ribs. Believe me, it is worth the wait. 36 [email protected]° for “BBQ” pork ribs. 72 [email protected]° for beef short ribs. Corned beef brisket 48 [email protected] 68° works well for me.

    Then there are eggs. 63° for an hour or two is the most famous. And is nearly bullet proof ( the cooking — not the egg). The egg is very soft, including the whites, but works beautifully in a Benedict. 75° for 13 minutes is more like a traditionally poached egg, but is quite time critical and very dependent on the size of the egg. Diameter not weight. Again it is thickness that matters. It is one of the rare time critical SV cooks as you are aiming at a temperature gradient to get the whites firm but the yolk soft. Leave it too long and the yolk hardens. Too short and the egg is simply not cooked. You can also pasteurize an egg but leave it essentially raw by holding it @54° for a couple of hours. If you go up to 55° you get much the same, but the white takes on a milky tinge and it is harder to whip. The yolk is great for mayonnaise though and Pam makes friands with the whites.

    I hope this a good enough start. I am sure Helen will chime in too with her different viewpoint. She has done a lot more with veggies than I have. And has different opinions on what is properly cooked.

    #28850
    Helen Adams
    Guest

    This one is pretty comprehensive although some of the minimum times seem a bit short/long.
    https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-time-and-temperature-guide.
    This one is More what I have found to work.
    http://www.molecularrecipes.com/sous-vide-class/sous-vide-cooking-time-temperature/

    You should try it:). Some things take quite a while but a piece of fish is pretty quick (20-30 minutes for me). Or steak for 1 hour.
    You don’t need to vacuum seal your food, I only do it when I am planning to freeze it before or after cooking.

    I am usually cooking for myself so I don’t care how long something takes, just how it tastes at the end:), but cooking for a family several times a day sous vide is less practical IMO. But having your fish/meat cooked virtually unattended is a big plus no matter how many your are cooking for.

    #28864
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    I love these charts – especially the Polyscience egg chart! I think what I’ll do is take the Chef Steps Reference and just use one per type of food using their ranges in temperature and time and then credit them in the footnotes.

    Maybe when I get more than one voltage converter and can have two electric pressure cookers going at once Sous Vide will be more appealing.

    THANK YOU!!!

    Ciao,

    L

    #28877
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I told you you should have requested the Aussie Breville :P

    Actually I quite like ChefSteps egg calculator

    But I also use the polyscience app. Available on iDevices for a small payment. Not sure if it is also available on android. Quite useful for strange cuts of meats. Though it always assumes cooked to temperature or higher.

    Kenji is also good reading on eggs.

    #28876
    Helen Adams
    Guest

    Can’t you get a North American type power bar that will plug into your one voltage converter giving you more outlets? Perhaps I could mail you one.

    #28879
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Helen! No, my voltage converter is for 1500 watts and IP is 1000 watts the Breville 1100 watts. Although they usually don’t go to the max at the same time I have no way to predict when they do and ensure that I don’t end-up loosing the pressure cookers. Manufacturers spend A LOT to get them to me – so I can’t be as risque with the electrics as I am with the stovetops!

    I know where to get a voltage converter I just can’t justify spending €130 on it – even at the US base store (where my new friend shops once every 3 months) it costs the same.

    Greg, I try to get the same product my readers will get when they buy it. When manufacturers change the voltage they make other little changes to the pressure cookers – and that can keep me from finding that “easter egg” or special little function of use for a pressure cooker that I usually note in my reviews. : )

    THANKS SO MUCH to both of you!!!

    Ciao,

    L

    #28880
    Anonymous
    Participant

    FYI. :P is a smiley poking his tongue out. In other words “don’t take this comment seriously”. ;)

    #28883
    Helen Adams
    Guest

    @Laura I have the same type of problem with my wiring. Too many outlets on the same breaker(s). ! had at least 6 1000 watt appliances all on the same circuit. A one point I had to turn of my computers to vacuum:). Plus lights/electronics/etc. I wasn’t worried about the appliances being damaged, but about possible damage to wiring. Plus we have been having a lot of weird partial power failures this year. And the occasional brown out. In the Yukon it is a lot worse. Town power goes out at least once a month and usually more often. No blown up electric equipment that I know of though. But I managed to get it sorted out so I don’t blow a breaker either anymore.

    Pretty sure the Instant Pot wouldn’t draw a lot of power in sous vide mode, especially once the water has reached temp. Same with both Pressure cookers once they reach pressure. But what do I know:(.

    Sounds like you have far too much on your plate at present anyway, but.. if you happen to come across a lovely piece of inexpensive fish it only takes about 20 minutes.

    #28888
    Helen Adams
    Guest

    Hi Greg. Missed your earlier post as it was posted after mine but appears before it.
    I don’t actually have many ideas about properly cooked food. Just about how I like mine cooked. If someone wants a well done steak or a hard poached egg, that is fine with me. I don’t even whinge when I am cooking it. And if they are cooking I usually manage to choke it down with a smile except for the hard poached eggs:)
    I love the predictability of Pressure cooking and sous vide, but not always the results. Purely subjective. And I am willing to try almost anything just out of curiosity. Or spend ridiculous amounts of time getting something as good as possible.

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