home Forums Pressure Cookers Instant Pot Bone Both recipe for Instant Pot

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  • #14690
    Jennifer L.
    Participant

    Hi. Is there a recipe for bone both (primarily beef or lamb bones) in the Instant Pot? I’m looking for the specific settings on the new Duo-60. I’ve seen some comments on converting stove top pressure cooker recipes to the Instant Pot by extending the time, but my broth is still coming out with very little gelatin. Two recipes that I’ve seen say to get the stove top pressure cooking to high, and then reduce to as low as possible to maintain pressure. Not sure how that translates to the InstantPot settings; maybe the InstantPot does that for me automatically? I’ve used the Soup setting so far to minimize splatter in the pot. First I tried 50 minutes, but got very little gel. One recipe said to cook for 3 hours, but the Duo 60 maxes out at 120 min/2 hrs on the Soup setting. I got a little more gel with 120 min, but still not like when I simmer on the stove top for 24 hours. I don’t think my water to bone ratio is the issue as I got great results on the stove top with even more water. I would appreciate help with specific InstantPot settings or any other useful info! Thanks!

    #14694
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I can’t offer advice on the instant pot, but if you Google Heston blumenthal beef stock, you should get some ideas for a very good beef stock. I am pretty sure I have seen his fat duck cookbook beef stock recipe online somewhere. He uses a Kuhn Rikon though.

    Wow. 24 hours on stove top is a long time. You will inevitably lose a lot of water in that time. Perhaps use normal high pressure setting rather than the soup setting, and just barely cover the bones.

    #14706
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I came across this one on Nom Nom Paleo.
    Again not specifically InstantPot, but it is specifically Pressure Cooker:
    http://nomnompaleo.com/post/16004110328/quick-pressure-cooker-bone-broth

    #14724
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Jennifer, first let me direct you to my stock-making post. It covers some stock basics: start with cold water, add a little acid, etc. and then the recipe actually covers some pressure cooker stock (broth) basics: just-cover the ingredients with liquid, use natural release, etc.

    How to make stock with a pressure cooker

    Cooking time is not the only thing that will get a broth to gel – any of the other factors mentioned above (like liquid ratio) could also affect it.

    I know a lot of chefs do their stocks hours and hours in the pressure cooker. Personally, I think this comes from their cooking school old-style stock-making methods.

    I made a chicken stock under pressure for 30 minutes, and another for 2 hours. The flavor, texture and consistency was not really noticeably different. I didn’t taste it and go “Wow! that extra hour and a half was amazing!” My experience is that once the pressure cooker extracts the nutrients and flavor from the bones, that’s it. Cooking it longer is not going to extract any more.

    I don’t have personal experience with lamb bones – but due to their size (bigger than chicken but smaller than beef) I would say maximum nutrient extraction will happen in about 45 minutes at full pressure. So that would be about an hour in your Instant Pot.

    Ciao,

    L

    #14726
    Jennifer L.
    Participant

    Laura and Greg,

    Thank you both for the info. I had read Laura’s chicken broth post and NomNom Paleo’s posts before, but I’m still not sure how to translate the instructions to an Instant Pot. I’m confused by the many buttons/settings.
    * On the Instant Pot, what button do I use — Soup, Manual, or some other button?
    * Sounds like I should use the High Pressure setting for the hour of cooking?
    * Does the Instant Pot automatically manage the piece about reducing the heat once pressure has been reached?

    Thanks again,
    Jennifer

    #14727
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I just had a read of the manual. It makes me relieved I have my Kuhn Rikons. I don’t feel the need to rush out and get a PhD in Rocket Science to use them.

    Anyway, it looks to me as though you could use either “Soup” or “Manual” as both cook at high pressure. Soup seems to be more geared towards clear soups, so I would be inclined to use “manual” and dial the time I want.

    I have made lamb stock, and it worked much the same as beef. Two hours is probably overkill, but if you can afford the electricity, then just set that and check up on it after that. I can’t see that there is anything to stop you just firing the machine up again for another two hours if you feel the need for even more time. As you are using the liquid, rather than the solids, you cannot really overcook it.

    As for the gelling, if it is not working for you, try tossing in some chicken feet. I know you are aiming for a beef/lamb stock, but they won’t noticeably alter the flavour. They WILL increase the gel significantly. And break up the all bones so the marrow can be extracted more readily. You can also boil the stock after it is finished to concentrate it some more. 24 hours on an open stove is going to lose a lot of moisture. You won’t lose anywhere near that in the InstantPot.

    If you want a browner “meatier” stock, add some skim milk powder to the tray when you are doing the roasting phase. Not Paleo friendly if that is what you are aiming for, but it works a treat as the proteins in the milk powder boost the maillard reaction.

    Sorry Laura. For some reason, I completely forgot you have stock recipes. Doh.

    #14728
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Greg, thanks for sharing your stock tips – good stuff!

    Jennifer, I’ll let you in on a little secret: I only use manual mode on Instant Pot. :)

    Just hit manual button and then push + or – until you get to the minutes you want and then don’t touch anything else (there is no start button). In a few seconds it will beep and the display will say “on” that means it’s going to bring the contents to a boil and begin building pressure. When pressure has been reached, it does a few more beeps (I forgot how many) the timing you put in will start counting down.

    Ciao,

    L

    P.S. If you hold the + button down for a second it will start counting up faster instead of hitting + for every minute you want the pressure cooker to go over the default displayed (30).

    #14748
    erica
    Participant

    I have made bone broth in my Kuhn Rikon, and it gelled very well after 30 minutes. I have not tried it in my Instant Pot (I agree with you Greg, the manual is not easy to read) yet, but I believe Nom Nom Paleo did. I would think the Instant Pot would make just as good a broth as a stove-top Pressure cooker. Perhaps add 5-10 minutes to the time to account for the slightly lower pressure, but I have found most things cook in the same amount of time as they do in the stove-top PC.

    I think the main thing you need to have good gelling is knuckle bones. When I make Chicken broth I always add feet. The knuckle bones have a lot of cartilage in them which results in good gelling. A mixture of meaty bones and knuckle bones will give you a flavorful broth with a good gel.

    #14965
    Jennifer L.
    Participant

    Thanks for the info, everyone.

    Laura – it is a BIG secret to use only the Manual setting on the Instant Pot. Makes me wonder why all of the other buttons/settings exist… I’m clear on the InstantPot operating instructions — just wasn’t clear when to choose which setting.

    I’ve since tried two more batches of bone broth using the Manual setting at high pressure. One batch with lamb bones for 90 minutes and one batch of chicken stock from a whole carcass. Added just enough water to cover the bones and used vinegar. Neither one gelled up. I regularly made these stocks in my crock pot (24 hour simmer) and got nice gel without adding extra knuckle bones. Not sure if I’m using too much water or something is up with my InstantPot or what. Hoping to try again with some knuckle bones.

    Thanks again for your help.

    #14979
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I am not sure what is going wrong here. Attached is a photo of a Chicken Stock I made a few days ago. Photo is today as I was making a chicken noodle soup for lunch.

    As you can see there is ample gelling. Pressure cooked on high for 45 minutes.
    Two carcases. One raw, one a roast leftover. Included all bones including wings, but no feet. I chopped the larger bones so it would all fit neatly in my 5L Kuhn Rikon frypan. As my knife skills are very poor, there was a fair bit of meat on the bones.
    Ingredients were
    2x Carcasses
    A slurp or two of olive oil
    2 Carrots chopped roughly
    A few celery stalks chopped roughly – Three or four that were leftovers from another dish
    1x Onion sliced into wedges
    1x Star Anise
    Salt
    20ml Tomato paste
    A few parsley stalks
    A few sprigs of thyme
    Water to cover. It came to just under the 2/3 mark.

    I fried the onions in olive oil until softened and a little charred. Then added the other veg, then the chicken and fried, stirring now and then, until the veg were softened a little. Then tossed in everything else, brought to high pressure and left there for 45 minutes. I am at 1000m and have found I need to add a little to Laura’s timings. This is extreme though. Natural release then sieved through muslin and stored in the fridge overnight, then removed the fat layer.

    For the soup today, I just added some of the roast chicken leftover (What didn’t go into the stock) and some chopped parsley leaves and some risoni. Boiled until the risoni was cooked. Then added some water to dilute it as I had a phone call in the middle & it got reduced a little too far.

    #14992
    erica
    Participant

    It is strange your broth isn’t gelling? I make stock in my stove-top PC, and I get great gelling. In fact, I usually do 3 batches with the same bones, and all 3 batches gel! I usually do the first batch for 45 minutes, the second batch for 35 minutes, and the last batch for 30 minutes. I always do a natural release which can take a bit of time, so that also adds to the cooking time. I keep all our chicken bones in the freezer until I have a full bag, then make a big batch of broth to stock the freezer. I do add a few feet if I have them. I haven’t tried making it in my Instant Pot, but I can’t imagine why it wouldn’t work the same way?

    #17131
    Doris2
    Participant

    In the last couple of days I have made chicken with some vegetable scraps stock for chicken and dumplings and ham hock stock for beans according to instructions in my new Hip Pressure Cooking cook book by Laura. I used the manual setting of my Instant Pot and the time that Laura recommended. I boiled down both stocks in the open pressure cooker after they were done to concentrate my broth.
    I find ham hocks yucky looking so I used only the bits of ham and the stock in the beans.
    I read the cookbook cover to cover. It is outstanding, a real treasure, full of practical recipes and instructions.
    Doris

    #17298
    Doris2
    Participant

    I have been making stock in my Instant pot using Laura’s instructions from her book Hip Pressure Cooking. I use the Manual setting and set for the time recommend in the cookbook. After allowing the pressure to drop for 10 minutes, I remove the bones and vegetables and use the Sauté button to boil reduce the stock so it requires less space to store.

    Very Interesting tips in this thread as well.

    I am a bit of a cookbook addict. This is my favorite pressure cooker cookbook. I read it through cover to cover, something I don’t think I have ever done before with a cookbook

    #17313
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    scharned, thanks! BTW, Instant Pot asked me to film a bone broth recipe for their new pressure cooker. So I can’t wait to show it to you guys when it’s ready!

    Ciao,

    L

    #17324
    Doris2
    Participant

    Laura, I made greek yogurt from your video on Instantpot.com. It was easy and economical and far better tasting than store bought.
    Doris

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