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  • #16975
    Aless6
    Participant

    Hi Laura,
    This is the pudding recipe that I’ve used for 40 years with my old Prestige ‘jiggler’ p/c er. Could you please convert it for my Fagor Duo please? It’s nearly “that” time again! (This is an Australian recipe.)

    112g plain flour 112g stale bread (broken up into smallish crumbs)
    224g currants 224g sultanas
    112g raisins 224g light brown sugar
    224g margarine/butter 4 eggs (lightly beaten)
    1 grated carrot 3 T brandy
    1 t ground nutmeg 2 t ground mixed spice
    1/2 t bicarb soda blanched slivered almonds (opt)
    Soak fruit in brandy overnight.
    Put sifted flour, bicarb soda, margarine/butter, stale bread, and brown sugar into a large bowl and knead together by hand.
    Add dried fruit and grated carrot, and mix well. Add spices and beaten eggs. Add halved slivered almonds, if used.
    Pour into greased basins (makes 2 puddings) not quite to the top. Cover with aluminium foil (with expansion pleat in centre) and place in pressure cooker with boiling water (about half way up the basin).
    Steam each pudding (with no pressure/weight) for 20 minutes, then cook at 5 lbs (this is an OLD pc er!) for 1 1/2 hours. (The pudding should weigh about 1 1/2 lbs before cooking.)
    This pudding freezes very well.

    As a matter of interest, the original pudding recipe made SIX puddings. I later found out that the recipe donor came from a family of 9 children (she forgot to tell me that!). After that first year, I reduced the ingredients to the above to produce very successful puddings. Extended family have always said it is the best they’ve ever had.

    #16985
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I’ll wait for laura to comment but it should convert directly. Remember that being an Australian recipe, the tablespoons will be 20ml, not the more widespread 15ml. Use low pressure as that will be closest to 5lb pressure. The unpressured start should prevent the flame thrower effect laura has commented on in the past. Where are the sixpences? ;)

    #16992
    Aless6
    Participant

    Hi Greg,
    I can’t find the reference to the ‘flame thrower effect’ anywhere. Could you enlighten me, please?
    I read somewhere that the un-pressured start was to allow the activation of the raising agents.
    Have never used coins in my puddings, as we went decimal in 1966, and the equivalent coin to the sixpence is a 5 cent piece that is made of copper and nickel (not good in puddings!). ;-)

    #16997
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Somewhere on this web site. I can’t remember exactly where. Laura regaled us with one of her early experiments with the pressure cooker. She had used a spirit of some kind and did not boil off the alcohol prior to sealing the unit. The result was that nearly pure alcohol vapour jetted out of the valve under pressure. It caught fire. So she had effectively reinvented the flame thrower. She probably prefers that we don’t remember her admitting to it.

    As your original recipe has you steaming for 20 minutes prior to putting the lid on, this should not be an issue with this particular recipe.

    #16999
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Aless6, thanks so much for sharing this tried and true Christmas Pudding. I’ve been looking at a few hundred pudding recipes (because I had in mind to publish a Christmas pudding – but Italians don’t exactly have a tradition of making Christmas Puddings) and almost all call for suet. So imagine my joy of seeing your treasured recipe with butter and eggs, instead! It gives me hope that if I were to propose a suet-free pudding I won’t be run off the internet. : )

    Quick re-cap of the flame-throwing incident: I ran out of white wine and thought that doing the braised lemon chicken (a family favorite and lesson 5 in the pressure cooking lessons) with Limoncello liquor might be a good idea. Well, it was terrible idea!!! I could see from across the kitchen that the pressure cooker was throwing flames instead of vapor from the valve. It took a lot of courage to sneak from below and turn off the gas. Then I ran out of the kitchen, closed the door and waited about half an hour (I would have waited longer but the kids were hungry) to see the state of things. The result: chicken flambe’ with a melted pressure valve but everything else relatively intact and undamaged. Lesson learned: never bring a pressure cooker to pressure with alcohol!!!

    Apparently I’m not alone as a famous cooking school in Seattle – which shall remain un-named- told me they had a similar problem pressure cooking bananas in rum. I thought it prudent not to experiment further given that I don’t have an unlimited supply of pressure cookers or adequate safety gear.

    I got off easy – but have now added a warning about pressure cooking liquor in the recipe converter.

    Greg is right to be concerned, and I’m glad he mentioned it. : )

    However, I would not worry too much about soaking dried fruit in liquor since it will be in a pudding batter inside a bowl and not be used to bring the cooker to pressure – you’ll be using water for that as you always have.

    OK, now to your conversion!

    Yours is a pretty easy pressure cooker to pressure cooker conversion. Fagor’s “low” pressure is 8psi, so very close to your jiggler a 5psi. So, that means that you can cook it for a little less time: maybe just do one hour. Also, your recipe doesn’t mention it, but I would open with the natural release and also leave the pudding in the cooker for at least another 30 minutes after the cooker has lost pressure. That’s because you’ll want to cool the pudding down slowly so it stays moist and pudding-y!

    Ciao,

    L

    P.S. Be sure to come back to let us know how it turns out

    #17022
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Actually the original (round) 50c piece works quite well. It was pure silver. They stopped using it as e price of silver went up and the metal content became worth more than the coin, with predictable results. I still have a few though.

    Pre decimal currency shows up at reasonable prices at coin and stamp fairs quite regularly. I saw a bunch of threepences and sixpences at my local CWA stall last weekend. Just don’t expect to find any 1930 pennies.

    #17045
    Aless6
    Participant

    Thanks for the quick reply,Laura. The info re pressure reduction is excellent! I think that cooking for an hour will be better, as my first puddings done in the Fagor last year were disappointingly dry!!! I’d never had that happen before, with the jiggler, so it was a sad event (esp. as my son (host of Christmas lunch last year) had told his (quite arrogant) new mother-in-law about ‘Mum’s fantastic pudding’ !!!!!!!!!!)

    I’m glad ‘my’ recipe will be useful, as a non-suet recipe! I have made this one so many times and it is a beauty!! (I freeze them both, then use just one for CD, and keep the other to enjoy mid-year. I defrost the pudding in the fridge, and then re-heat in the microwave- not sure how long…)

    #17046
    Aless6
    Participant

    Thanks for all that info, Greg. I was a bit embarrassed when I noticed later that you are Australian too!!!! (I’d assumed you were from the States…) I didn’t expect any pre-decimal currency to be still circulating, except for when it’s valuable. :-)
    When I was a child, we were told about about the 1930 penny, and I remember looking for it carefully every time we had change. ;-)

    #17087
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Be sure to cover it tightly, too! when I first started pressure cooking puddings I kept wondering why they turned out rock-hard after a few minutes but figured it was my inexperience with this particular dessert. Much later, when I researched why a roast went from succulent to dry and shriveled before my very eyes I learned about how evaporation is accelerated when there is a greater temperature difference.

    Well, there is no greater temperature difference than the one in your kitchen vs. the food that comes out of your pressure cooker! So, now I call for most meat recipes (steamed and braised) and almost all desserts (especially puddings and cakes) to be opened with natural release to cool them down a bit before removing the lid, and then tightly covering until cool or ready to serve.

    No more rock-hard puddings or shriveled meats after that!! : )

    As you can tell, pressure cooking was (and continues to be) a learning process for me, too. Much of this information (do not cook with liquor or don’t let stuff shrivel dry by opening it too quickly) is just not really mentioned or written anywhere one just needs to pressure cook ALOT to encounter and unravel these quirks – and I pressure cook everything. If anything has ever gone wrong for you in a pressure cooker, I’ve probably done it too.

    That’s why I like to say that I make the mistakes so you don’t have to. : )

    Ciao,

    L

    #17100
    Aless6
    Participant

    Thanks for even more excellent info,Laura!

    #17136
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I am in the process of trying this in my Kuhn Rikon. The manual says low pressure is 0.4 Bar which is about 6psi. But I live at 1000m (3,000ft) so I will use the original 1.5Hr at low pressure. I will then let it cool in the pot before lifting the lid.

    I made a few changes:
    I “metricated” the ingredients list so it uses logical (to me!) quantities rather than the “converted from imperial” in your original. Then for this test I halved it again to make just one pudding. I will add my quantities (before halving) at the end. Also I used Panko crumbs as I didn’t have any stale bread in the house. And Dark Brown Sugar as I didn’t have Light. I also forgot to put the (softened – hey it’s 30º here) butter in early, so it went in after the fruit and carrot. I also grated about a quarter of a nutmeg as I refuse to use the powdered stuff. And I used cold water and brought it to a boil in the pot. I don’t have a kettle large enough for that quantity of boiling water. I also use the low KR trivet to hold it off the bottom.

    I’ll let you know how it goes. Currently in the simmer unsealed stage

    Ingredients
    250g currants
    250g sultanas
    125g raisins
    60ml brandy (3 Australian Tablespoons)
    125g plain flour
    1/2 t bicarb soda
    125g stale bread (broken up into smallish crumbs)
    250g light brown sugar
    250g margarine/butter
    1 grated carrot
    1 t ground nutmeg
    2 t ground mixed spice
    4 eggs (lightly beaten)
    blanched slivered almonds (opt)

    #17138
    Anonymous
    Participant

    A quick update.
    Cooked at low pressure. More or less. (I left it alone for a while and it drifted into overpressure for a few minutes). For 1.5 Hours. Natural release, then I left it unmolested for another one or two hours.

    Cracked it open and tucked it.
    The result: DELICIOUS!!!
    I will add a photo once they are processed.

    #17140
    Anonymous
    Participant

    And a photo

    #17146
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    WOW… Greg, I think you’re onto something with the Panko bread crumbs. Looks delicious!

    Ciao,

    L

    #17148
    Aless6
    Participant

    Good on you,Greg! I’m glad you worked it out your way, and that you had a good result.The panko crumbs is a great tip! I keep a packet for coating crumbed fish fillets.
    As I have several freezers ;-) I take hoarded frozen leftover pieces of bread and run them through the Breville Wizz every so often, bag and re-freeze for use in recipes. I quite like making a savoury crumble topping on winter casserole dishes using breadcrumbs. Hate wasting sourdough bread at any time!!

    #17354
    Anonymous
    Participant

    After the first time, I felt the bowl was only about half full, so I tried this again using the full quantity – my measurements. Though I replaced some of the currants with glace cherries – I was short on currants.
    Would you believe it was too much for the bowl by about the amount I increased the recipe. So I also made two individual serves in some ramekins. I cooked them for 20Min Unpressurized, then 30Min at high pressure. They worked out well, just a little dry, so 20 Min at pressure next time. The big pudding was superb. I measured the bowl. It holds just a little over 1.5l, but it is ancient (19th century when we were definitely Imperial) so it is probably really six cups.

    #18226
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Greg I want to start doing some experiments with a variant of this recipe, but I’m curious about the quantities you used. You halved it and it was too little and then you made 1 whole recipe and it was too much by two ramekins?

    Just confirming as I’m thinking of doing 75% of this recipe (3 eggs) with my experiments as I wanted it to fit in a 4-cup heat-proof dish (which is what I call for in most of my recipes).

    I just realized I don’t have nearly enough dried fruits in the house!

    For now, I’m going to do some tests on more of a sponge-type Christmas pudding to see if the initial steaming with no pressure really makes any difference in the rise – my theory is “no” but I’d feel much better saying it to others when I’ve been proven or disproven it by actually doing it.

    Ciao,

    L

    #18227
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Ok, reporting back on my experiments with pre-steaming a pudding without pressure. Unfortunately the photos didn’t turn out but let me explain what I did.

    I made four small ramekin-sized sponge puddings. I weighed the same amount of batter in each ramekin. Two were covered with foil and two were un-covered.

    The first batch I put one covered and one un-covered pudding on a steamer basket in the pressure cooker and I boiled the water in there (without the pressure valve) for 10 minutes and then added the valve and pressure cooked for 10 minutes, plus natural release.

    The second batch I also put one covered and one un-covered pudding and, after cooling off the pressure cooker, I pressure cooked them for 10 minutes with 10 minute natural release.

    As expected, both covered puddings were grossly under-done. The pre-non-pressure steamed pudding seemed done but it was raw in the middle – the center fell down while it was cooling off. The just pressure cooked steamed pudding was completely raw. This is not news because I know that covering a pudding tightly really slows down the cooking time.

    The un-covered puddings fared much better – and it’s in fact why I recommend not covering most steamed desserts in the pressure cooker in my cookbook.

    The pre-non-pressure-steamed pudding was golden, rounded and well cooked. The just pressure cooked pudding actually was a little bit bigger but looked a little pale. However, the big shocker for me was when I dove into the puddings with a spoon. The just pressure cooked pudding was bigger but inside it was a bit rubbery and not really “cake-y”. While the pre-non-pressure-steamed pudding was the consistency of what I would expect a sponge cake to be.

    BOTTOM LINE: There is definitely a benefit to the steaming step before pressure cooking a pudding.

    I was wrong. ; )

    Ciao,

    L

    #18234
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I rounded the quantities to “sensible” metric quantities. I didn’t worry about the eggs as mine were very big. About 65—70g each. Then I halved everything for the first test. The photo of the raw mix above is this test in the bowl I used. It is an ancient ceramic “dolly varden” shape — a bulging cone. It was my wife’s grandmother’s. And her mother is 96 not out. I checked the volume and it is 1550ml filled to the brim. When I did the full mix (my quantities), I filled the bowl to about a finger width below the rim to allow for expansion. Say about 1250ml. I then filled another 2x 200ml ramekins with the leftover mixture. The ramekins have a “double rim” and I filled them to the lower rim, so that measure is quite accurate.

    HTH Greg.

    #18272
    Aless6
    Participant

    Hi Greg,
    I had to tell you that,on a bad day personally, you gave me a great laugh.Only an Aussie would say ‘her mother is 96 not out‘…..Loved it!!

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