home Forums Problems or Issues Deodorising a gasket

This topic contains 23 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  gteague 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #15122

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I know I have seen this here somewhere, but for the life of me I cannot find it now I need it.

    The gasket on my 2.5L KR has picked up odours to the point of it affecting subsequent meals. Too many curries I guess.
    I vaguely recall something about soaking the gasket in some sort of solution to cure this, but cannot track down the details.
    I have tried BiCarb and Vinegar (separately) to no avail.

    Could you enlighten me please.

    #15125

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    I recommend using a 50% white vinegar solution. I don’t want anyone reading this to go use their expensive (and less acidic) balsamic vinegar ; )

    1. Get a medium- to large heat-proof glass jar and squish your gasket in it.
    2. Fill the jar half-way with white vinegar and the other half with boiling water (like from a kettle).
    3. Cover tightly with cling-film and let stand overnight
    4. Rinse with warm water and dish-washing detergent and air-dry before putting back in the pressure cooker.


    Do not use bleach! Gaskets that have any percentage of natural rubber will harden and silicone gaskets will change color and be weakened (guess how I know?!?).

    That should greatly minimize, if not completely remove, the odor. Come back tomorrow to let us know how it went. : )

    Ciao,

    L

    #15131

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Better, but by no means odourless.
    I will buy some more cheap and nasty vinegar next time I am at the shops, and give it another try.

    #15132

    tweakz
    Participant

    Chlorophyll and Cucumber I’ve heard of as natural deodorizers. I also think that it might make sense to just swap gaskets depending on what you make? I think it would be cheaper than using vinegar repeatedly in the long run.

    #15163

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I got more vinegar and tried again. No noticeable improvement over yesterday. Maybe I should try my $50 bottle of Balsamic. ;) Actually I would need two bottles to get to half way up the jar.

    Instead I have dropped it into a jar of detergent and water. Will let you know how it goes tomorrow.

    Then I will try Tweakz’ idea of cucumber. No idea where to get chlorophyll.
    As for the extra gasket, I see a couple of problems. First up, I can no longer get them in my country. That adds $50 (or more) to the cost for shipping. That’s a lot of El Cheapo vinegar right there. Second, knowing my habit of missing details, I am likely to stink up the “clean” gasket by mistake in fairly short order.

    #15164

    tweakz
    Participant

    I’ve never heard of using vinegar for odors until now. I’d be more inclined to trying the sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) more. -I could be wrong though.

    Lol @ balsamic.

    Narcotics sniffing dogs work because it’s hard to conceal odors. They travel right through a lot of things. I have this same odor issue with jar lids. You might just have to give it time to silently burp the odor out.

    Chlorophyll is the green stuff you see in leaves: Romaine lettuce, spinach, and cucumber skins are a good source of it. Ultimately though the odor is embedded in the gasket, and will take time to migrate out.

    #15165

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I too thought bicarb (NaHCO3) was the way to go. I have used it to take the smells out of my fridge for years. Which was why I tried that when I couldn’t find the method Laura espoused. When that didn’t work, vinegar was the next trial, as that is another readily available “safe” household chemical. But I didn’t use anywhere near the concentration L recommended when she did reply. I also used room temperature, not boiling.

    The vinegar, as per Laura’s recipe, did help, Just not to the full extent. My final try with detergent and hot water (tap not kettle) also helped. I can still smell it but it is now at a point where I am prepared to use it. And have. A lovely T3 for lunch. Though since I am dabbling with Paleo at the moment I subbed Coconut Cream for dairy cream. NOT a good idea. For the second bowl, I just left it out. Much better, though a little sharp.

    Yes I know what Chlorophyll is. I was a science teacher in another life. The way your original post read, I thought you were talking about a pure extract, not just boiling up some greens.

    #15166

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Heating the vinegar improves its penetration – its the same principal that allows you to make hot sauce in the pressure cooker in a minute vs. just sitting hot peppers in vinegar and waiting three months.

    I know what you’re thinking, now… I do not recommend pressure cooking your gasket in vinegar (assuming one has more than one pressure cooker) since I cannot guarantee it will not deform – in theory shouldn’t but I can’t guarantee it.

    The important thing is that, when using hot vinegar which is a potent de-greaser, most of the oil-based elements on the surface of the gasket have been removed and they should not be changing the taste of the food in your cooker.

    I don’t think anyone has found a definitive way to remove odors from silicone completely. If you look on the websites of housewares everyone has their own advice on what to do removing odor from silicone spatulas, cupcake liners, and baking sheets.

    With the combined knowledge in this forum and our stinky gaskets maybe we can figure out a better way.

    Tweakz, tell me more about why you think chlorophyll will work.

    Ciao,

    L

    #15170

    tweakz
    Participant

    Yikes: Chlorophyll was something I read about over 20 years ago long before I had a computer / internet. I was very gullible then, and hadn’t given it much thought. Now I see it’s one of the quack claims used to sell pills. Thank you for questioning it, and sorry for the misinformation!

    #15189

    BHart
    Participant

    I have used 50/50 white vinegar and hot water and added a couple of tablespoons of baking soda with great success for removing odors.I do this right in my pressure cookers, placing gasket in the pot and cover with lid just to hold the heat in. Let soak about 15 minutes or so, rinse well and reapply a thin coat of grapeseed oil to the gasket to precondition.
    PS: Adding the soda to the vinegar causes chemical reaction ( it will foam up, a lot). The stainless shines beautifully. I would NOT do this in pot if the pot is aluminum.

    #15287

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    BHart, thanks for sharing your experience. I did a little research on baking soda and vinegar (I believed it resulted in salty water) and I found out that briefly before the chemical reaction, vinegar and baking soda make “carbonic acid.” This, is an acid that is very unstable and quickly breaks down but can be used to clean and disinfect surgery wounds. So why not clean and disinfect the gasket?

    I’m going to give it a shot and report back!

    Ciao,

    L

    #15288

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Well, I didn’t see any improvements with the vinegar/baking soda combo beyond what I’ve already gotten with an overnight hot vinegar soak. It was fun but the gasket was still impregnated with smell – I don’t think this worked better.

    I think the shine you’ve been getting is just from the vinegar. That’s how I clean my pressure cookers to make them photo-ready for my reviews and recipes: a spitz of vinegar/water and wipe will remove any rice “ghosts” or small discolorations and stains from my hard water. Then, I the outside and handles witha drop of mineral oil on a paper towel and then buffer it off with microfiber cloth – just the outside as mineral oil is not food-safe – and all the bakelite parts look brand new and shiny without any muck or guck and my fingerprints don’t show on the stainless steel.

    Ciao,

    L

    #15517

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    I wanted to try another anti-stinky gasket remedy and I found none of mine stink! I think the other piece of the puzzle to keeping the gasket odor-free is not to store the gasket with the pressure cooker.

    I hang mine on a towel rack next to my sink.

    I’ll have to wait until after my next curry to try my next remedy to see if it works better than the vinegar. But the lesson so far is: the vinegar soak does not remove 100% of the scent right away, but with open-air storage of the gasket all of the smells eventually dissipate.

    remove odors from gaskets

    What have you tried to remove the odor, and has it worked?

    Ciao,

    L

    #15595

    againstthegrain
    Participant

    I have two gaskets for my Instant Pot DUO so I can alternate their use. I do what I can to keep the gasket in the lid clean when using the Instant Pot so that I don’t have to wash it each time I cook, but even so, some persistent food odors do seem to cling to the gasket esp if using really aromatic spices, like Moroccan spices. I use the Instant Pot almost daily, so it’s on the counter nearly all the time. When not in use I keep the lid open in the handy lid holder handles. That seems to allow persistent odors to fade a bit.

    I clean the silicone gaskets in the dishwasher, placed in the top rack right before I run a DW load, directly on top of all the other items in the top rack. I always use Finish brand all-in-one Quantum DW detergent. No lingering odor issues in washed gaskets so far, though I’ve only had them just over half a year.

    #15688

    coleen
    Participant

    I don’t have any solutions for that problem. But I have a 8 qt mirro and the booklet says to store lid with gasket side facing up, not to store it closed up on the pot. Know I know why.

    #28698

    Helen Adams

    Today I made shell fish stock and noticed my gasket had some odor. Plus it turned orange. So id did the usual, pressure cooked some vinegar and apple cider vinegar, then tried regular vinegar and baking soda in a paste. Then rubbed it with a cut lemon. Pretty much the same.
    SO having a backup gasket I used degreaser and baking soda which I use to clean my ceramic top stove if it gets badly caked (I had tenants for a few years). Smell gone and orange about 60% gone.

    I was shocked at how badly my gasket discolored from the shellfish stock. Was pretty white before.

    #30430

    Cam

    I make homemade soaps with scents and I always used the 50/50 vinegar and soda mixture to remove the scents before the next batch but, I let the molds soak at least 24 hours. I also make lotions and colognes and use different product bottles to hold them. I wash them in hot, soapy water then place them submerged in the vinegar/soda solution. There have been times when it takes several days to remove the odors.

    I wonder if soaking it in tomato juice or tomato juice with lemon juice would work. Hey, it works on the odor skunks leave on the dogs. :)

    #31536

    Kimberly O.
    Participant

    I wonder if this would work: http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2011/01/natural-de-skunking.html <– It’s supposed to work for de-skunking a dog. I might have to try this.

    Ingredients

    1. 1 quart 3% hydrogen peroxide
    2. 1/4 cup Baking Soda
    3. Optional: 1-2 drops of liquid dish soap
    4. Optional: Rubber Gloves
    5. Bucket

    Instructions

    • Gather supplies (including dog), and put gloves on because once mixed, the solution must be used immediately.
    • Choose your location: I did this outside tying dog to a post to free my hands with a hose handy, but a bathtub would work in a pinch.
    • Mix peroxide, baking soda, and dish soap.
    • Stir well and quickly apply to dry dog, avoiding eyes.
    • Thoroughly work into coat so it covers and permeates as much hair as possible.
    • Allow dog to “soak” 5 minutes as odors are neutralized by the chemical reaction
    • Thoroughly rinse dog with water
    • Repeat process if necessary (I only did it once and we were skunk free)
    #31552

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Kimberly, that’s a great idea! Let us know how it worked.

    Ciao,

    L

    #31571

    HelenAdams
    Participant

    Interesting. I have read that hydrogen peroxide is a better solution than bleach in many cleaning chores and very good to spray your fridge and moldy containers with if you find a moldy food item.
    I have always used tomato juice on the poor doggies but it is pretty messy.

    #32618

    barleysinger
    Participant

    I tried both white vinegar and bicarb, and neither did a lick of good. What I want is a gasket that does not ruin my food. None of the new pressure cookers can manage this minor feat. Every one I have used in over a decade turns white rice into “grey rice” (even 2 year old gaskets) and the food all tastes like an old spark plug (or the inside of a car exhaust pipe).

    I miss the old gaskets from the 70s. If they are going to go with silicon I wish they would use REAL surgical silicon, but if they used the “real deal” the gaskets would not die every 18 months. They would last 15 to 20 years easily (even with oil exposure) and we can’t have that.

    #32625

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I bought two pressure cookers at the same time and from the same company. It just so happened that it was just at the time they were changing from Rubber to Silicone (or maybe I just got old stock from the store) and I got one of each. The rubber one got hard and started having problems after a couple of years. The Silicone one is still going strong. As is the silicone replacement I invested in. I don’t know if I was lucky or you were unlucky.

    #32628

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Like Greg, mine too! Any rubber or rubber-blend gaskets (from cookers received in the last 10 years) get hard and useless faster than silicone. Though my silicone gaskets eventually end-up getting “streched out”. Perhaps, the rubber quality was different 50 years ago!

    BTW, gray rice is NOT a sign that stuff is coming from your gasket- it is actually the result of pressure cooking. It will happen in any pressure cooker of any age with a gasket made of any material.

    Here are details about that:

    What are the Effects of Cooking Rice in a Pressure Cooker

    Having the rice taste funny, however, is another thing!

    Ciao,

    L

    #32657

    gteague
    Participant

    good info. i made the mistake last night of dumping a whole package of birds-eye frozen onion pieces into my pot of pintos. needless to say, it’s not just the gasket that stinks now. luckily, i’m fairly ok with onion odor or i might have had to open a window and blow the odor outside. [g]

    actually, i had a bowl of onion soup this evening made with the liquid i saved. it was intense!

    /guy

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