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  • #23456
    gteague
    Participant

    starting a new misc thread because the other one was getting a little long.

    did i mention we had record-setting rain here in west texas starting about 0500? and with zero warning. i have a rain gauge on my mailbox and i’ve gotten 4.302″ inches since 0500 (about 6 hours ago). the local airport logged 7″ or more which they’re saying is a record by over 3″ for one day and we have more coming. coming down again as i type.

    and my cooking point to all this is: aren’t i the happy camper that all the pots and pans i ordered coming in this week are stainless steel! i suspect they’re gonna have a real wet trip.

    /guy

    #23460
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    We’re sweltering in Italy. We’re in the first of a two-week “African Heat bubble” It’s only 33C/91F but it’s 98% humidity. So we’re steaming over here!

    Since we put in AC in our bedrooms last year I’m typing from my bed. Also, the kids are laid out next to me doing their homework (in Italy you get a workbook to do during the summer – they’re just starting the 2nd month of their THREE month vacation).

    But at least the kids started summer camp last week so I can get some work done. They go to a beach resort at 7:30 am and have breakfast, then they go to the beach all morning, then a “hot” lunch (aka first & second course), then they hang-out in the shade of mediterranean pine forest and do different sport activities each day- archery, bike riding, military boot camp, baseball, soccer or basketball (in small clearings).

    Then they have a snack, a shower and change I get to pick them up at 5:30 fed, clean and tiered. They’re even too tired to fight. Ahhhh…

    I wish I could go to their summer camp!!

    Ciao,

    L

    #23464
    gteague
    Participant

    i remember when i lived in napoli the whole city would empty out every morning and the traffic would be 5 lanes to the beach with one lane left to go to the city. and then at sundown it reversed and god help you if you didn’t allow for which way the traffic was going when you left the house!

    is their beach camp further up the amalfi coast from naples?

    of course those neapolitans who could afford it had summer homes and many only came out in the campagna where i was (lago di patria outside possuoli) for the summer. this included my landlady who was a real countess. i was living in a villa that was actually the servants quarters to the stables to the castle. she had redone the stables for her summer home but had sold the castle long ago and it now housed an english pub. which was a delight because i could walk there and play darts and drink lime & lager!

    loved italy! /guy

    #23465
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Beautiful memories! Actually, we’re on the “knee” of the boot. This is the kid’s resort:
    https://www.google.com/maps/place/Camping+Village+Parco+della+Gallinara,+Via+Malvito+Vecchiarelli,+2,+00042+Anzio+RM/@41.5284068,12.6919131,12z/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x1325bd9693b04fbf:0x376a880410ff159a

    We actually live in a resort town that triples its population June, July & August. The last two weeks in August it quadruples and we get almost no water pressure at certain hours of the day. : (

    Also, we’re close enough to Rome that Spring and Autumn weekends we get lots of Romans coming to their “beach house”.

    It can be trying to spend all summer here because there are parties that go on every day at all hours. And now it’s in fashion to shoot fireworks from the beach starting at midnight and going on through 2 or 3 in the morning. Which is why for the last three years we travelled in August (to run away!)

    On the plus side, like nowhere else in Italy, all the stores stay open through lunch and on the weekends and – of course- the nearby beach which is sublime and the water is still warm in September and October when all the Romans are back to work!

    Ciao,

    L

    #23466
    gteague
    Participant

    ah! great area around anzio. it’s up (or down?) the coast quite a distance from pozzuoli i see. i traveled the other way on the cheap trains–to sorento and even for 2 days to capri via a navy discount! took the (then new) hydrofoil. i used to have one of the chess sets they make in sorento.

    it sounds great! love to make it back some day. i tried to stay when i was there. /guy

    #23471
    Anonymous
    Participant

    It’s winter here. Grumble. Grumble. At least it doesn’t snow much.

    #23473
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    It is only 24C here but muggy.

    #23487
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    So Greg… soup? ; )

    Last night for dinner we just had lettuce dressed with balsamic vinegar “spray” and olive oil. Small Buffalo Mozzarella Balls and bread. I even bought the bread because I didn’t feel like heating up the kitchen making it!!

    Sometimes we make it through a meal without pressure cooking anything. ; )

    Ciao,

    L

    #23494
    gteague
    Participant

    love that mozzarella d’buffao! i wonder if those were what dr suess had in mind when he wrote ‘green eggs & ham’. maybe we’ve been misreading it all along and he was describing a typical neapolitan snack of mozzarella and prosciutto? [g]

    #23533
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Not a bad theory at all! Lots of cultural exchanges between US and Italy at the end of WWII. Some left-overs.

    -Italians call “chewing gum” “chunga” which is actually like someone saying “chewing gum” with an Italian accent. The word stuck.

    – When Italians like something they eat, they point to their cheek and say “schick” which means something is good. This is MY theory alone – but I think that probably came from an American soldier’s English lesson during lunch. He likely pointed to his cheek and said “cheek, cheek” and I bet all the Italian soldiers nodded, pointed to their cheeks and repeated “schick” and took another bite.

    – Americans sailors brought bacon on-shore and traded it for various things. That gave birth to “Pasta alla Carbonara”. The best pasta dish invented in the history of mankind, only after gnocchi al pesto (my fave).

    British soldiers left their mark as well. They introduced their “tea time” finger sandwiches (cucumber and cream cheese, or tuna and tomato). You can still find them for sale in every Italian bar in the afternoon. They’re called “tremezzino” which means “three thrity-ish” – tea time!

    Unfortunately, no one drinks tea in Italy anmore. Except for me.

    Ciao,

    L

    #23539
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hey. My daughter is in Torino at the moment. She drinks tea. Mind you she had a hard time finding some.

    Yes soup. French onion to be exact for the last two nights. Tonight was chicken roulade. Loosely based on yours but it has come a long way. No longer cooked in the PC. And the stuffing made a left turn somewhere. Tomorrow I am hoping to have a go at Burrata for the first time. Not buffalo sadly. That’s rare here. You would be horrified at what we call mozzarella here. I know I am. I am working through ChefSteps siphon course and burrata’s the next lesson. A week ago I had never heard of it but when I picked up some bocconcini in the supermarket there was some right next to it on the shelf.

    #23541
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    Gee chicken roulade sounds interesting. Care to share your recipe? I have made beef and pork but not chicken.

    @Laura
    Interesting anecdotes. My uncles all 6 of them went to Europe as Canadian soldiers. Volunteers not career military. My poor father, a lovely man, spent 2 years in a German POW camp. Was pretty horrifying for all of them I think as AFAIK they never discussed it even among themselves. But fortunately they all came back in one piece.

    #23545
    gteague
    Participant

    i mentioned the castle formerly owned by my countess landlady was an english pub when i was there. i worked at the nearby nato base and we fielded a darts team for the tournaments they held–everyone knows the brits love their darts! actually, i proved very good at it and our mixed nationality team finished 2nd behind an all brit team which included at least one former professional player.

    anyway, the ‘host’ or home team had to furnish snacks at halftime and the brits would invariably roll out onion and butter or lettuce and butter cut diagonally with the crusts off. i quite liked the onion and butter ones, but we never got anything as nice as the ones you described!

    and stores that were open during siesta were unheard of in naples–even with all the military folks to sell to. but they were open very late and eating at 10 or even 11pm was not unusual.

    #23551
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @helen,
    It’s not so much a recipe as an idea. I have mentioned it before. It here goes

    Lay down a sheet of cling wrap about 18″ – 2ft long. place paper thin prosciutto on It. About 4 slices. Hammer a chicken breast flat and place on the prosciutto. It should roughly cover it. Smear the filling over the chicken and roll up in the cling film. Twist the ends to firm it up. Then vacuum seal. Cook SV @62°C for about an hour. I usually make up a batch of them and freeze. Then I drop them into the SV for about 2 hours.

    Fillings.
    This depends on what is to hand.
    Last night was baby spinach, crumbled feta and almond slivers

    IN the freezer I have morello cherry jam & shredded coconut. Also fig jam, spinach leaves and toasted pine nuts.

    @Guy since I know you are watching, place a boneless chicken breast down on a piece of plastic. I use the plastic wrappers magazines come in. Cut it almost in half and open it like a book place another sheet of plastic over the top and hammer it until it is about 5mm (0.25″) thick. I use a meat mallet, but a rolling pin or even a beer bottle will work as a hammer. The head on a real hammer is too small to work well. For the cut, put the chicken down so it sits flat. hold the knife horizontally and slice from the curved edge towards the straight one. Stop when the meat will open out more or less flat. When you hammer, it will spread sideways but not lengthways so keep that in mind when you are laying it on the plastic. Peel off the top sheet, then pick up the bottom sheet with the chicken on it. Place the whole thing upside down on the prosciutto then peel off the plastic. Hold the knife so you won’t cut yourself if it slips.

    I started at 72° (USDA recommendation) but it was way overcooked. I have been progressively dropping the temp. 62° is good but I will probably go a little lower yet. As long as I stay above 52° and cook long enough to pasteurize it will be fine. The time will get longer as I go lower.

    #23560
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    So far I have not been impressed by the sous vide chicken. Haven’t given up but almost edible but why bother describes my efforts so far.

    I do like Chicken Kiev and roulade etc.
    Somewhere I have a pressure cooker recipe for beef roulade with a bread stuffing instead of the usual pickles etc., so when I saw chicken roulade I thought that would be swell with chicken.

    Me, I put my roulade/cutlets etc. flat in a plastic bag and alternate between pounding and rolling with a rolling pin. 2-4 quick pound/rolls gets them pretty thin usually unless they are stubborn.

    #23584
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    test

    #23647
    gteague
    Participant

    got my first copy of cook’s illustrated magazine today. i thought (wrongly it seems) that a subscription would give me access to their website but they seem to have broken down every single aspect of their subscription fees and charge (quite a considerable amount) for every little thing. this model has failed miserably at 95% of the orgs which have tried it, i guess cooks are just more gullible or have more money to spend!

    i paid the invoice for the physical magazine (which is only 30 pages, yet only comes out bi-monthly at a cost of about $6 or $8 an issue i think–i paid $20 but the price on the website is $24. and then i signed up for the trial of the web subscription which they want $37/year for, but is necessary to access the equipment reviews.

    those latter have been driving me nuts and have been a total roadblock in my attempts to assess equipment. every google search takes me to a consumer-reports type comparison for various categories of kitchen items at the ci website and then i’m locked out because i haven’t had access. very frustrating and now (now that i’ve actually _bought_ all the stuff i’m going to buy for awhile) i can actually read some of the tests and reviews.

    @greg: the kampot pepper is sort of underwhelming. it reminds me of the white pepper i use which is very smooth and subtle. perhaps it’s a connoisseurs pepper because i preferred the grocery store peppercorn grinder i got a few weeks back and was one of the best ‘taste to price’ value i’ve gotten so far. btw, i paid about 1/3rd what the amazon price is–that hardly ever happens!

    http://amzn.to/1eQM4DU

    with the recent order though, i did manage to improve on the salt in that set with some Himalayan pink salt which, to my palate, tastes great:

    http://amzn.to/1eQMlqt

    i’m trying to get caught up on bills and stuff so i can try out the new smart pot with either the steak or the chicken that’s been in the freezer calling my name for over a week now. btw, the quiche i bought at the new supermercado grocery store is horrible–basically it’s creamed spinach with a layer of cheese on top sitting in a thick crust with no detectable eggs at all. i guarantee the cats wouldn’t eat it and i might end up throwing the remainder out.

    #23651
    gteague
    Participant

    sadly, most of the reviews are old and don’t include the latest goodies such as my duxtop induction plate. glad i found this out before my trial period is over. so i’m off evaluating other sections of the site.

    #23653
    gteague
    Participant

    these guys are a scam. and to add insult to injury, you can’t cancel the trial membership on the web page where you started it–you have to call them and of course they have limited hours.

    total waste of my time.

    #23659
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    Too bad about the quiche. I know you were looking forward to it. I tried to post the other day about quiche and impossible pies and frittatas. Probably it never went through, but maybe it did in another thread so forgive me if I am being repetitive.

    Quiche for me is eggs/onions and cheese. Bacon, eggs, onions and Swiss cheese is my fave. I prefer it baked in a crust, but if a quiche craving comes on me I will sauté the bacon and onions, cover it with cheese and pour on some beaten egg, either freshly beaten or from a carton and pop it into the oven to bake and fluff up. Basically a Frittata but most Frittatas don’t have cheese.

    Impossible pies are made with Bisquick and are very easy and economical to make. Very quiche like in flavour and taste good to me hot or cold. I always make extra and have never thrown any out. And sadly or not I always use processed Swiss as I find it tastes as good when baked and melts better than the real thing at about 1/4 the price or less.

    #23660
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @Helen, I think a few posts are going AWOL. I am sure I posted this morning about our first snowfall today but that seems to be missing. I had assumed I just forgot to hit “Submit” until I saw your post. I definitely saw you waxing lyrical about quiche and frittata the other day, but I can’t find it now either.

    I have been on an omelet jag the last couple of days since guy posted about them somewhere. I Made one in my all singing and dancing copper core all clad. Guess what? It stuck. Today I made another in my humble steel de buyer (about 1/10 the cost). It slid right out and as a result the pan cleaned much quicker. Both were delicious though.

    #23661
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    Probably some of my posts deserve to go AWOL:). I will be looking at the de buyer and at some of guys pans although I cannot in any way shape or form justify buying another pan until I give away or throw out at least 6. Plus I am still planning on buying the pressure oven you laughed at. Just gotta see that 45 minute turkey. Oh well, it is all fun until someone loses an eye.

    #23667
    gteague
    Participant

    i read those missing posts at the time. i did notice that whole chunks of the thread popped in and out while we were having the /reply/ problem. seems that some of them stayed popped out.

    @greg: i told you i was stationed in wa long ago and i don’t remember it being anything but hot although it’s possible i might have left before full winter–i can no longer remember the exact months i was there but it might not have been a full year. is snow a rarity? you’d have to call it a rarity here in west texas because it’s rare for us to get one every year or to have more than two in a year. but then it’ll surprise you and dump 8″.

    and i just reviewed the thread, and the only snowfall post that came through was the one where you said it ‘rarely’ snows, which is what i would expect to be the case.

    #23671
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Snow is rare here. Once. Maybe twice a year and I am in one of the colder parts of the country. Yesterday’s effort nearly didn’t qualify. Just a few flakes and they didn’t settle. When we went to our farmers market yesterday about 200m higher than we are. There was some snow on the ground and a lot of the stall holders were missing because the roads were closed further west.

    Never heard of snow in WA. At our latitudes we mostly only get snow at altitude and WA is too flat. Doesn’t mean it hasn’t happened though. I recall working in Sydney once and seeing snow out the window. I was on the 25th floor. It didn’t reach the ground.

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