home Forums Request Line I need a bacon jam pressure cooker recipe

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  • #11068
    fitzage
    Participant

    It seems that bacon jam recipes are becoming more common, and I’m going to have to try one of them. But they all require quite a lot of simmering, and I’d like to shorten the process by using a pressure cooker. I’m not sure the best way to go about it, though.

    Some of the recipes:

    #11096
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Great minds think alike… I was JUST looking for a bacon jam recipe. These links are very tempting – especially the one made with coffee. I hate drinking coffee but I love to cook with it.

    BUT… I was not planning to make bacon jam under pressure.

    One of the things your pressure cooker can’t do is reduce liquids under pressure. Retaining liquids is one of the things that makes pressure cooking faster.

    My pressurecookerized version of Julia Child’s French Onion Soup still has all of the saute’ steps and only the “boil” part is done under pressure (for a ridiculously short amount of time).

    How to convert a recipe to the pressure cooker

    Since I also have a multi-cooker I was going to inaugurate my cooker’s SLOW function to make the bacon jam. Though, personally, I don’t know if I could stand smelling bacon for three hours.

    If you have a stove top cooker, you’re already ahead of most people. The thick base is the perfect replacement for a cast-iron dutch oven. I would put it on the lowest imaginable flame you can attain from your cook top and make it go (without the pressure cooking lid). If you have an induction burner, even better. Set it, there at the lowest imaginable temperature and then set the integrated timer for three hours – checking on it only occasionally to make sure it doesn’t dry out and char completely.

    Sorry.

    If anyone reading this HAS figured out how to make bacon jam under pressure – please share!

    Ciao,

    L

    #11097
    fitzage
    Participant

    Yeah, I figured it would still need a simmering step to reduce the moisture, but that it might still take less time, particularly if including some baking soda to enable the caramelization without having to sauté too much.

    #11098
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Hmmm… that’s an interesting application. It works on veggies – why not meat?

    However, the modernist applications I’ve heard about were with carrots, onions and cauliflower (all very alkaline veggies). Since bacon can be quite acidic I wonder if the baking soda would irreparably change and dull flavor.

    If you want to experiment. We can calculate the right amount of onions to use for the cooker to reach pressure with the least amount of liquid.

    What size and type of pressure cooker do you have?

    Ciao,

    L

    #11100
    fitzage
    Participant

    I have a Fagor Splendid 6-quart (only the one pressure setting).

    #11102
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    OK, the Splendid instruction manual says your cooker needs a minimum of 1/2 cup of water for 10 minutes or less of pressure cooking. To be on the safe side let’s add enough onions to make 3/4 of a cup. Since onions are 80-95% water (depending on the variety) let’s assume 80% to be on the safe side.

    3/4 cup of water weighs 175g. So let’s add 20% of the onion meat. That comes to 210g or 7 1/2 oz of non-sautee’d onion to throw out enough cooking liquid for your cooker to reach pressure.

    So if you double this (to say a pound of onions) you should be able to just soften them before you add the bacon, baking powder and whateverelese and slap on the lid without any additional liquid.

    Personally, I would say to sautee them without adding salt, and then tossing salt about a minute before slapping on the lid so the onions save their water for building pressure.

    Happy experimenting!

    L

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