home Forums Welcome to Pressure Cooking School! Jasmine Rice Bain Marie method

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  • #37812
    tokapaho
    Participant

    Hi all,
    I need some help. I live in a small house hold and only cook on occation as food last generaly 2-3 days. However, I LOVE Jasmine rice. Love it, especially fresh. So when I saw that there were a Bain Marie method I jumped on it, immediately. However, I only want to cook about 1 cup of rice at a time, and I use a glass container that holds 4 cups total, but every time the rice comes out a hard. The outside is soft but inside is uncooked. How do I go about to get this right? My rice / water ratio = 1:1 and I put about a cup of water in the stainless steel basket. I have tried 5, 10, and 15 min but no luck.Nr or QR does not matter, problem remains. Please help…..

    #37814
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    tokapaho, do you have a ceramic cereal bowl? Use that! It’s taking too long for the large bowl to heat up and cook the rice. Also, the ratio is too low.

    I know that there is someone going around advocating 1:1 for every kind of rice and then pressure cooking for a long amount of time. But it doesn’t make sense to me when you can just adjust the ratios and, in the case of jasmine rice, literally just pressure cook for one minute.

    I noticed you mentioned that you added “about a cup” of water but when pressure cooking grains you have to measure the ingredients precisely (like when baking a cake). Rice in particular breaks apart if too much water is used and remains hard if too little water is used.

    My cooking chart notes the ratio of 1:1 for rinsed jasmine rice – for un-rinsed use 1 1/4 cup of liquid, instead.

    To conclude, use a smaller bowl,follow my recommended ratios and cooking times, and measue the liquid and rice precisely:

    stovetop & electric pressure cooker cooking time chart

    Ciao,

    L

    #37817
    Annette
    Participant

    @Laura: I know you scrupulously test all your recipe recommendations, so just treat this as a data point:
    After I had such good luck with the brown-rice cooking times from this site, I decided to try your ratio & cooking times for cooking jasmine rice directly in the pot (so no extra bowl). Major fail! It came out crunchy, even though I had already been somewhat incredulous and cooked it for two minutes, not just one.
    The rice was Aldi’s store brand, so probably quite fresh. And I followed all the instructions but, at least for my PC and that rice, it’s going to need slightly more liquid and a longer cooking time

    #37818
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Thanks for sharing your experience Anette, was the Jasmine rice rinsed or soaked?

    Ciao,

    L

    #37820
    Annette
    Participant

    Not rinsed – why? (Looks at chart.) Oh! I see – I may have used the water amount for the *rinsed* rice. That would explain a lot…

    #37822
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Actually, the chart only had rinsed time before with the words “(rinsed)” next to it. After this discussion I added the dry rice ratio which I already know from testing (any-kind of rice rinsed is always less 1/4 cup).

    The reason I only had “rinsed” for Jasmine rice is if you knew how Jasmine rice is dried – laid on the floor on straw mats – I imagined everyone would WANT to rinse it. Check your package for origin. If it wasn’t grown in Europe (Italy is europe’s rice basket) then it was dried in less than desireable hygienic conditions and you probably want to rinse it. That is actually how Thai’s cook it, they rinse it. It’s supposed to bring out more of the Jasmine flavor (ditto for Indians and Basmati).

    I spend all my free time watching food and ingredient documentaries so I absorb an inordinate amount of useful facts. ; )

    Ciao,

    L

    #37823
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    OK, look at this… I forgot to mention the bare feet. Of course this is not yet hulled, but it gives you an idea of how rustic the whole process really is before it gets poured into neat little plastic bags for us to buy at the supermarket.

    #37825
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Mmmm. Extra flavour.

    #37829
    Annette
    Participant

    No kidding! I had assumed that anything I buy in those hygienic-looking packages (rather than at, say, a bulk bin) would be clean. Not so, eh?
    This reminds me of Miss Vickie’s obsession with rinsing legumes – I am sort of assuming if the package says “Müllers Mühle” (i.e. reputable company) on it, the beans will be just fine. But maybe not?

    #37830
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    I know that the rice in Italy does not need to be rinsed because every step from harvest on is done in hygienic machinery. So, I never expect anyone to rinse arborio rice. They don’t ship sacks of Arborio around the world for re-packaging either, they pack and vacuum-seal it into bricks and send THOSE around the world.

    With bulk foods and spices they are put in a sack or bin and shipped in a container around the world and then sent to re-packaging facilities. During that trip lots of things can happen. Spices, for example, have an “acceptable level of contaminants” which include insect parts & etc. The more you know the more you will get grossed out.

    What is important to know is that for the most part, re-packaging facilities are just that. They cannot guarantee quality, purity or hygiene – that has to come from the grower. When buying any ingredient, there will usually be a “local” packaging facility and a “country of origin” (depending on the laws of your country) and the more important indicator of quality is always the latter.

    Ciao,

    L

    P.S. I rinse my beans because of Miss Vickie, too! I remember she posted some compelling close-up photos to show how dirty the beans are in the package. This also depends on the grower, of course. I’ve bought packages of dusty red beans grown in India as well as packages of shiny red beans grown Italy (at three or four times the price, of course)!

    When I do recipe testing, though, I specifically buy the lower-quality ingredient so I can have the experience and timing that the majority of my readers will do. When I cook for my family, I splurge and get the more expensive Italian-grown stuff.

    #37836
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    In Canada rice is clean and beans are practically shiny. (Big export crop) I rinse my sushi rice because it cooks correctly in rice cooker, but other rice is fine. SO far I am not fond of pressure cooked rice but every so often I try.

    Edit except Laura’s risotto which is always great.

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