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  • #23076
    gteague
    Participant

    @grey, you around today? i’m about to try either the cod or the salmon i got today. most likely the cod–salmon should keep well in the freezer.

    btw, my local grocery (a very large one) didn’t seem to have any imported black peppercorns at all. i was going to get lamb today but all the meat was expensive today and i settled for more chicken thighs which i’ll do in the pressure cooker.

    /guy

    #23084
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hey I’ve got a new name.

    Sorry about the delay. As I know you have noticed, the forum has been playing up.

    Anyway, Not sure about cod. Never cooked with it. It is not a fish available locally. Except imported and smoked. My sources say it should cook much the same as salmon.

    For that I bag it with some EVOO – about a tablespoon – and a sprinkle of salt. Sometimes I put in a sprig of dill or some other herb if I have it on hand. And maybe a grind of pepper.

    I cook it @ 50ºC for about 15 minutes. With an extra half an hour if it is frozen. As usual with SV, it won’t matter a great deal if you go over by an hour.

    I nearly always serve it with my caper mix sauce, so I tend to just peel the skin off, but you could sear the skin in a blistering hot pan for a few seconds to make it crisp up.

    For a single serve of my caper sauce,
    melt 4g flour with 6g butter. When it starts to foam, pour in 60ml milk. and stir over medium-low heat until it thickens up. For this quantity, it will only take a minute or two. Then add salt and white pepper, about a 1/4 tsp of each. This is a Bechamel sauce. It is the basis of a lot of other sauces that are well worth trying.
    Also add about half a teaspoon each of dijon and wholegrain mustard. I use Maille brand from France. and about a teaspoon of baby capers. Black pepper also works, but the flecks are more noticeable and the flavour is not quite the same. You can use normal capers, but I prefer the smaller size in this. If you use salted capers, rinse them before chucking them in.

    A parsley sauce would also work. Add chopped parsley instead of the mustard and capers. Or a dill sauce. Or…

    I use basically the same recipe in lasagne too. But I use about 600ml milk (a pint) for that. THe other ingredients get scaled up too. Then it takes about half an hour to make. For the lasagne, I use nutmeg in place of the mustard and capers.

    #23103
    gteague
    Participant

    tks @greg! yeah, laura just recently chased the bug out of the forum, so it’s been hard to tell what got posted and what didn’t.

    i cooked two pieces of cod at the recommended time/temp at either chef steps or anova. but i also compared against the thermoworks meat charts. i believe it was 132º/55º at 32 minutes is what i decided on.

    but i think i’ve got to work on the vacuum process–one of the pieces came out stone cold and the other one wasn’t cooked that evenly, although 90% of it was ok to eat. but it too came out not warm at all. i had to microwave it which dried it out and toughened it.

    i still have two pieces of salmon and next time i’m only doing one piece at a time and making sure i have a good vacuum. but it sounds like i’m 5º higher and 15 minutes longer than you list.

    today, i’m going to cook one of the two tbone steaks i have left in the pressure cooker so i can compare the results with the one i cooked in the sous vide. plus, it’ll give me an opportunity to check the saute function for laura.
    /guy

    #23104
    Anonymous
    Participant

    One of the things you need to manage carefully with SV is serving temperature. When you fry something conventionally, you get the surface up to 200°C or more. When you cook it in a pressure cooker, it reaches 120°C. With SV it only reaches 50°C or so. It will cool pretty quickly. On the plus side, it doesn’t need to rest so you can serve it sooner. But it helps to put it on a warm plate too.

    The best easy test to work out if you have removed enough air is to see if it sinks or not. If it is buoyant you need to get more air out. If it sinks it should be fine. Some things will only just sink though. Oil, after all, floats on water. It is not the vacuum that matters. It is the absence of air. The air acts as an insulator slowing down cooking. Also if the food is floating the part above the waterline is not going to cook very well.

    55° for the fish should still be fine. It will just be closer to “well done” than I like it. It still should be in the region of medium though.

    #23106
    gteague
    Participant

    my lazy fault on the vacuum issues both times i’ve tried to cook in this thing. i’ve been trying to get off on the cheap using ziploc bags and the water displacement method along with a soda straw to suck out the air. btw, the water displacement hasn’t worked at all for me.

    i have some vacuum tools and bags, but i was trying not to use their expensive bags if i didn’t have to. mea culpa.

    /guy

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