home Forums Pressure Cookers Fagor Pressure cooker vs slow cooker

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  • #887218
    tutu10
    Participant

    I’m curious about the pros and cons of getting a slow cooker vs a pressure cooker. They both seem fairly easy to make meals with (throw in some ingredients and get a delicious dinner), but obviously the pressure cooker is much faster. Does this impact the quality of foods produced? Also do you find one more convenient than the other?

    Thanks :)

    #887290
    Suzanne
    Participant

    Tutu, this article may answer your questions:

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/10/why-pressure-cookers-are-better-than-slow-cookers.html

    I personally prefer using a good quality stovetop pressure cooker over an electric multicooker, but many people prefer electric multicookers for pressure cooking. And if you think you might want to use both slow cooker and pressure cooker functions in an electric multicooker, best read reviews to make sure both functions in the cooker you want to buy work equally well:

    https://www.cooksillustrated.com/equipment_reviews/1854-multicookers-electric-pressure-cookers/

    #887316
    Greg
    Participant

    Many electric pressure cookers will also function as a slow cooker. Though not at the same time obviously. And many people buy one of these multifunction cookers as their first pressure cooker. Pretty soon they usually stop using the slow cooker function and just use the pressure cooker function.

    Like Suzanne, I prefer to use a stove top pressure cooker. I have a slow cooker. It sits in the cupboard unused wasting space. I also have a sous vide setup. It does pretty much every thing a slow cooker will do – and more – better.

    To answer your specific questions:
    1. Does this impact the quality of foods produced?
    Yes. A pressure cooker preserves taste and nutrient quality way better than a slow cooker does.

    2. Also do you find one more convenient than the other?
    Yes. A pressure cooker is much more convenient.

    3. (throw in some ingredients and get a delicious dinner)
    No. All cooking methods need care and attention to detail. There is an old adage in the computer industry: Garbage In -> Garbage Out. It applies to cooking as well. As long as the ingredients are not off, you will probably end up with an edible dinner, but not a delicious one. If you think “food = fuel” it will probably do. Just don’t invite me round for a meal.

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