home Forums Recipe Conversions Silan (date honey)

This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  dsugar100 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #36027

    bexn01
    Participant

    I know I won’t be able to do all of this in a PC but I wondered if part of the first two hours could be done in one:

    Date Honey Syrup – Silan

    I love silan but not the time it takes to make. I have a feeling that you’re going to tell me that I’ll still need to set aside half a day to make it.

    There’s an Italian version made with figs. Figs aren’t in season yet so I only have dried ones. I understand you can still make it but you need to use more water or soak the figs overnight to help them become soft. Do you think the PC could be used for a “speed soak” to soften the figs before starting the recipe?

    Thanks!

    #36029

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Wow, this is an interesting condiment. I have never heard of it before but it sounds delicious!

    Yes, you can definitely do the 2- hour step in the pressure cooker. Remember, though since liquid does not evaporate you’ll have to reduce the liquid drastically. Since you’ve already done this, you know how much liquid should be left at the end of this process – from the picture in the link it looks like the dried dates were just-covered? So, when you do this step, only add as much water as you usually have left at the end of the process. Also, remember to open with natural release. For “pressure cooking” a dried date, I might suggest 5 minutes, but since your are “extracting” from them I would say to try 10 minutes, instead. Don’t forget to use Natural Release and come back to let us know how it compares to the usual 2-hour boil!!

    Ciao,

    L

    #36102

    bexn01
    Participant

    I purchased a little over 2 pounds of organic Medjool dates yesterday so I’m going to give it a try and will let you know the results. I’ll post some pictures, too.

    Costco has organic Deglet Noor dates available at the moment so I picked up a couple of bags. In Israel, date honey is made with Medjool dates but I think a different date is used in Libya (maybe Saidy?). Deglet Noors have a more delicate flavor than Medjool dates. They’re also not as sweet or moist. They’re a semi-dry type of date whereas Medjool is a soft type of date. I may need more water. Any thoughts on this anyone?

    I thought it would be fun to make silan from different types of dates and different cultivars within the types. I’m hoping this will be similar to different floral sources of honey. :-) I’d like to make silan from Bahri and Amir Hajj dates. I know a couple of places where I can purchase Bahri dates but can’t find a (US) source for Amir Hajj. If anyone knows of one please let me know! They’re supposed to have a taste and texture like caramel. I currently use Medjool dates to make a quick vegan one-ingredient caramel. I bet these would be even better. I would love to try my “Snickers” recipe with them. Hmm, maybe I should use the silan instead of a puréed date or maybe even date butter. I’ll have to do a taste test with all three and see which one is best, at least until I can get my hands on Amir Hajj dates.

    If the silan “Snickers” end up tasting the best, I’ll post the recipe.

    #36106

    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    Would love to hear your results! Once you’ve troubleshooted your way through this, with your permission, we can put together a guest post to share this technique with everyone. I think it will be interesting because it’s a condiment I never heard of AND it sounds super-delicious!!!

    Ciao,

    L

    #36116

    bexn01
    Participant

    That would be a lot of fun! I’ll try doing date butter, too, since it’s somewhat similar in the beginning. I’ve been wondering if I can use the leftover pulp to make date butter. I’ll have to think about this. Maybe don’t squeeze out every bit of moisture from the dates so it will be easier to push them through a sieve? Hmmm. Thoughts anyone?

    Laura, have you ever tried making Miele di Fichi? It’s basically the same thing but with figs. I think you normally use fresh figs to make it but I understand that you can use dried ones, too. The flavor is supposed to be more intense. Costco is selling 2.5 pound bags of organic dried Calimyrna figs (also known as Sari Lop or Lop Injir figs — Smyrna fig type). I don’t know if the fig type and cultivar matters. I suspect so, just like dates. Calimyrna figs are known for their deep honey flavor so I’m hoping they’ll be an excellent fig to use to make fig honey. I think Dottato (also known as Kadota fig — Common fig type) is used to make Miele di Fichi in Italy but I could very well be wrong. Laura, do you know? If this is the one used, it’s known for being very sweet.

    I plan to try making fig honey as well. I’ll be sure to let you know how it turns out. I may need to try to get my hands on dried organic Kadota figs, too. I’m going to have fruit honeys coming out of my ears! Hmm, I wonder if you can make one with prunes!

    PS) I found this while researching figs. It’s basically everything you ever wanted to know about figs but were afraid to ask. I wasn’t sure if anyone else would find it of interest so I included it JIC.
    http://www.ucanr.edu/datastoreFiles/391-296.pdf

    #886155

    dsugar100
    Participant

    I know this topic is a few years old, but I didn’t see any follow up with anyone actually making this and reporting on results.

    Here is what I did to use the Instant Pot for this recipe.

    I used a bit less than 2 lbs of dates (1 lb 13.8 oz to be exact). And I used Deglet Nour dates (that is what I had). I cut them up and put them in the Instant Pot with 4 cups of water (enough to cover). Then on high pressure for 30 minutes then natural pressure release.

    From there I followed the original directions. But I did simmer in the saucepan for about 45 minutes. It is the consistency of a thick honey.

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