home Forums Kitchen Chit-Chat Truffle flour, is anyone familiar with it?

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  • #20640
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    I bought a jar of Elle Essence truffle flour today because I have never tried a truffle or truffle oil etc. that I am aware of. Also it seemed very inexpensive compared to truffle oil. It is made in Italy, where truffle flour is supposedly popular?

    I have been looking for recipes and they are few and far between. Most say just add a pinch to a sauce etc.

    If anyone has a recipe or two I would be most grateful.

    Helen

    #20645
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    No, truffle flour is not popular in Italy. Fresh truffles, and truffle pate’ are popular here.

    I’ve never heard of truffle flour, but I assume the process is the same as creating “truffle rice” – basically they dry a piece of truffle in the flour (or rice) so that the flour absorbs the flavor.

    But there is no actual truffle in it.

    I would try the smallest bottle of truffle oil you can find – add it to finish any dish, especially mushroom dishes.

    Ciao,

    L

    P.S. Why not make a bechamel with the truffle flour?

    #20648
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    Thanks

    I got the mistaken idea that truffle flour was used in Italy from this article.

    The principle of truffle flour is old news.

      Italians have used it for years

    , to flavor crepe batters and pasta doughs. And a fresh truffle, which is purchased immersed in a tub of rice to keep it dry and fresh, often comes with a tip from the counterman to use the perfumed packing material to make a knockout risotto

    I did make your risotto recipe tonight from your lovely video and put a pinch of truffle flour in a small portion of it. Was okay, tasted garlicky to me. Wouldn’t say it was better than the untruffle-floured version though.

    I was thinking to get truffle oil, but this article and many like it kind of put me off.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truffle_oil

    What I bought was the fourth product on this page, made by Elle Esse.

    Was less than 1/6 the price though:)

    I have never had the opportunity to try a real truffle, and probably couldn’t afford to if I did. Was interesting to try the flour and I will try it cautiously in other things.

    Thanks for the information.

    Helen

    #20649
    Laura Pazzaglia
    Keymaster

    The problem with some reporters is that they visit one town in Italy and when they experience local products they says that “x is all the rage in Italy”. Italy is a collection of distinct regions which vary mightily in climate, geography and even cultural influences and traditions (from France, Austria, Yogoslivia, Spain & Greece and even the Middle East – just to name a few). Until recently, these regions were different “countries” – California is actually older than “Italy”!

    Just because Truffle flour is popular in Umbria it does not mean that anyone else in Italy has heard of it.

    It’s the equivalent of an Italian visiting New York, and then writing an article that in the U.S. bagels are all the rage.

    I’ve shopped and cooked in at least five regions in Italy (Lombardia, Trentino-Alto Adige, Lazio, Emilia-Romagna and Basilicata) and none of the grocery stores carry truffle flour – but you can get truffle oil in all of them. :)

    There are different kinds of truffles in season at different times of the year – if you can you eat it fresh. If you can’t you infuse oil, rice, or – apparently- flour with it to preserve the flavor.

    The flavor is in the umami range on the level of a really good gorgonzola cheese x 100. So, it’s not for everyone – some people might think it smells like really stinky socks – don’t try to change their mind. More truffle for you. : )

    Ciao,

    L

    #20669
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    A lot of disinformation out there. I have met many Americans who are very disappointed not to see igloos and dog sleds everywhere in Canada. I lived in the Arctic Circle for eight years in probably more than half of the remote communities and have never seen an igloo although quite a few dogsleds.

    The chances of me seeing/tasting a real truffle seem equally remote, but one never knows.

    One thing I really like about hip pressure cooking is that it is prettyinformation wise and the recipes/videos/advice is/are very really good and understandable. Knowing that you are both an expert cook and Italian is probably why I asked the question here.

    Not sorry I bought it though. Probably tastes nothing like truffles, but tastes pretty good.

    Helen

    #20979
    Chef Marsha
    Participant

    Hello there! I have been using truffle flour for years and keep a nice supply in my freezer (very important for keeping freshness and flavor). It’s always available in a pinch… I have used it in eggs, in a sauce, in a soufflé, truffle fries and in anything that you might think calls for flour and truffle essence. It is important to know that the truffles are ground into the flour and using an enormous amount will overpower a dish. Start out with a teaspoon or so in replacement for regular flour and go from there. Good luck and happy experimenting!
    Chef Marsha

    #20992
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    I do have mine in the freezer with a bag around the jar. Even with the jar tightly closed, a lot of the odour escapes:)

    Not sure if the Elle Esse truffle flour has ever been near a truffle. It might be chemically flavoured like 90% of truffle oil products sold here.

    I bought this because it was ridiculously inexpensive and I have never tasted even truffle oil.

    I am going to make some roux and will put some in. I am going to start with a tsp. to a cup of flour.

    Thanks for your reply. Nice to hear from someone using it.

    Helen

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