home Forums Kitchen Chit-Chat Why I don't use my PC to make créme brulée anymore

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  • #21737
    Anonymous
    Participant

    This ChefSteps sous vide recipe used to be behind the paywall – you had to take a paid class to get to it – but it appears it is now released for wider consumption.

    I only make 2 changes:
    1. I use 4oz jelly jars not the 8oz widemouth they suggest. This is one rich custard. A tiny pot is more than enough after a good meal.

    2. Let them cool a bit on the bench before putting them into the icebath. I lost quite a few jars to thermal shock when I first did this. I still ate the custard! It was too good to waste.

    I use my Anova, but I see no reason why it wouldn’t work in the Instant Pot Smart too as long as you use the Bluetooth control the set the temperature.

    #21765
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    I have been thinking to make custard in my Instant Pot or with my Anova (not technically brulée because no torch yet),
    I was looking at this recipe
    http://www.pressurecookingtoday.com/2013/12/creme-brulee-in-the-pressure-cooker/
    and the Douglas Baldwin video. Both look very easy.
    The ChefSteps looks a tad more complex prep wise but still easy enough.

    Big question:
    Why is the sous vide method better than the PC method? Better texture?

    Thanks
    Helen

    #21766
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Beautifully smooth and light.
    I was prompted to post after making a batch the other day as our egg supply had built up a bit excessively. It was actually this time that I absently put them straight into the ice bath. Two jars (of five) cracked and I wasn’t game to brûlée them. They also drew water in so they were less than pretty. They still tasted pretty awesome though.

    #21771
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    Nice to have fresh eggs.
    I’ll try the Chefsteps one first probably unless laziness wins out.

    The more I read on sous vide, the less I seem to feel I know, but I shall persevere. More successes than failures so far.

    Thanks
    Helen

    #21772
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I know what you mean. Sadly there doesn’t seem to be a Laura of the sous vide world. My experience so far tells me it is at its best cooking proteins. Especially eggs.

    The precision allows you to cook eggs almost any way you can imagine from apparently raw but pasteurized – great for mayonnaise – through the perfect poached egg to a perfect custard. All with predictable and repeatable results.

    Also the repeatability and forgiving nature has meant that fish in particular has gone from now and again with trepidation to a regular on the menu. I used to either over- or undercook 3 times out of 4.

    It has also become my go to method for reheating a sloppy takeaway like a curry. I just repackage into a bag and heat from frozen at 75°C. None of that “reheat” flavour.

    Like you though, I tried veggies this way and thought “meh!”. I am looking forward to trying that limoncello though.

    #21775
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    I saw the limoncello on the Anova site. Looks interesting but I have an allergy to distilled alcohol dammit.

    Fish has worked out good for me although I find it a bit coolish at 50 degrees. I accidentally cooked some (leftover from lunch out) salmon sashimi at 67 degrees and was pleasantly surprised to find it not over cooked but very smooth and velvety.

    Having no good chicken experiences so far.

    Two vegetables I have found very good (better or easier than conventional) cooked sous vide are the lowly green cabbage and caramelized onions for onion soup. Brussel sprouts were dreadful.

    My biggest problems are too many variations, most of which seem valid, and of course I can only eat so much.

    Not yet having torch I am trying to decide between ChefSteps crème caramel and Spanish flan for Easter dinner.

    The thing I like most about sous vide is high quality output at a fraction of the cost of dining out. Crème Brulee is typically $8+ in a restaurant. Making it yourself is practically free in comparison.

    #21779
    HelenAdams
    Participant

    PS:
    Laura’s website is kind of unique in that she combines expert unbiased (IMO) advice and info, but also takes the time to answer questions that have been asked or explained already (I have asked a few myself) with patience and without condescension. Her recipes are tested and so far, for me, they work.

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