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Do you want to know more about pressure cooking, but don’t know where to begin?  Tried to explain pressure cooking to friends and were answered with a blank stare? Want to show everyone how to save energy one meal at a time?

Here’s an infographic, a visual to convey information, to quickly explain the time, energy and vitamin benefits of pressure cooking – so you don’t have to.

Please share, post, pin, tweet and blog these infographics to spread the word.

UPDATE: We now added an infographic for electric pressure cookers, too.  Scroll further down this page to see it.

Infographic: Pressure Cooking Saves Time, Energy & Vitamins! (excerpt) full size here http://bit.ly/Zz07zZ

Infographic: Pressure cooking saves time, energy & vitamins! (electric pressure cookers)

Benefits of Pressure Cooking - Info Graphic!

 

 

This pressure cooker infographic contains the following information:

  • How The Pressure Cooker Works – in three easy steps;
  • Pressure Cooking is Fast – with table comparing the conventional and pressure cooking time for vegetables, roast, potatoes and beans;
  • Pressure Cooking is Green – with three charts: the first one compares the temperatures achieved by the pressure cooker vs. conventional cooking, the second compares the pressure cooker energy-savings with the savings achieved from new energy-efficient light bulbs, and the last chart compares the pressure cooker’s evaporation rate with that of a covered and un-covered pot of boiling water;
  • Pressure Cooking is Healthy – with chart comparing vitamin savings of pressure cooking vs. steaming, microwaving, boiling and roasting;
  • Pressure Cooking is Easy – visual comparison of how many pots, pans and strainers are needed to make a conventional pasta recipe vs. making pasta and sauce together directly in the pressure cooker.

PRESSURE COOKER MANUFACTURERS: Want a free, personalized version of this infographic to use for marketing your pressure cooker? Contact us!  

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11 Comments

  1. Now, we can safely say there is an info graphic for everything. THIS one was sorely needed.

    Thanks!

    Jen

  2. This is absolutelly great Laura, love it!

    Do you have references to the journal articles supporting the 90-95% vitamin retention figures? I’ve read it from a few people but never found the original sources…

    Enrique

    1. Those specific numbers come from Nestle’ Professional Kitchen Journal(page 7).

      Other nutrition studies not included in the infographic can be found mentioned in this article, (full citations at the bottom of the page):
      Pressure Cooker Nutrition.

      Ciao,

      L

  3. I love it. Very good. :)

    Another major point is a *lot* less liquid is required. For a 6 litre pressure cooker, I use about 250ml of water or cooking liquid for roughly 15 minutes’ cooking time, and approx. 150ml per extra 15 minutes or part 15 minutes cooking time. Less liquid to be heated = huge energy and time savings. Enough liquid just to keep the pressure cooker filled with steam. Obviously some recipes will require more liquid, especially for food which absorbs the liquid, such as pasta or beans.

    I have read that some people mistakenly “drown” the food under water and have the heat up too high when the pressure cooker is up to pressure. Doing either or both will definitely use a lot more energy than using less liquid and a lower heat to keep the pan pressurised.

  4. I like your graphic but the last piece is a little misleading. With the type of pressure cooker you are showing, you still need the stovetop and, in some cases, the colander.

    1. Gayle,

      You are right that you also need a cook top to use with the pressure cooker but the great thing is you no longer have to CLEAN it. Pressure cooking pasta sauce in the pressure cooker means NO MORE tomato splatters to clean on the cook top, back splash and anything else in splatter-shot!

      Also, since the pasta is cooked in the sauce – no need to dump out precious water through a strainer and down the drain.

      Ciao,

      L

    2. Laura,

      That’s true. And if you use electric pressure cookers, as I do, you don’t need the stove top at all. Sometimes, I even use mine as an extra burner without doing any pressure at all. I make a lot of soup and sometimes I don’t use pressure although, usually, there is some pressure cooking involved.

    3. P.S. I have recently updated the infographic to include the cook-top for stovetop pressure cookers. : )

      If you enjoyed it, pass it on!

      Ciao,

      L

  5. Loved the infographic. I was doing some research on pressure cooking for my website, http://www.TheApproachingDayPrepper.com, and found your site. Very helpful and motivational. I’m going to have to dust off my pressure cooker and put it through its paces. Thanks for the great site.

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