How meat's moisture adds to the pressure cooker liquid.

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pressure cooking school  Welcome to Pressure Cooking School!
 This article is part of Lesson 6: Marvelous Meats

Earlier in the series, I showed you how vegetables can contribute to the pressure cooking liquid because they’re 80-95% water. And, how I also described how this was important because there is little to no evaporation from the pressure cooker?

How evaporation from the pressure cooker compares to conventional cooking.

Well, the same applies to meat!

Fresh meat can be 45-70% water. Plus, if you add 10-15% more liquid for brined and frozen meats you’re going to end up with AT LEAST and an additional cup of cooking liquid for each pound of meat that goes into the pressure cooker. Those extra cups of liquid are not just the difference between a braise and a soup. They’re also the difference between flavorful and tasteless.

How meat's moisture adds to the pressure cooker liquid.

So, that’s the second secret to marvelous meat in the pressure cooker: tightly control the amount of liquid that goes into the pressure cooker in addition to the liquid-producing ingredients.

CONTINUE…


pressure cooking schoolCONTINUE Lesson 6: Marvelous Meats

How meat's moisture adds to the pressure cooker liquid.

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