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Luisa, is an Italian reader of Hip Pressure Cooking from a little town called Pieve a Nievole in Tuscany and not very far from Firenze!

Here is Luisa’s Recipe:
This dish was taught to me by my mother-in-law. Every time I make it, I think about her and how much we all miss her. She was really an exceptional grandmother, not the usual mother-in-law, she was kind, generous and she was like a second mother to me. I dedicate this recipe to her, and I hope that you all enjoy it.

A note on choosing a cut of meat from Cook’s Thesaurus:
Several cuts are well suited to oven roasting. The most elegant choice is a tenderloin roast, which is lean and tender, but very expensive. A rib roast (sometimes called a prime rib roast) isn’t as lean and tender, but it’s juicier and more flavorful. A good compromise between the two would be a rib-eye roast, which is basically a boneless, low-fat rib roast. Other candidates for roast beef are a top loin roast, top sirloin butt roast, tri-tip roast, round tip roast, and rump roast. Don’t assume that anything with “roast” in its name will work as roast beef. Some roasts are intended for pot roast recipes, for it takes hours of cooking in a liquid to make them tender enough for civilized consumption.

Luisa’s Roast Beef with Mushrooms in the Pressure Cooker
1 2lb or 1 kg. Beef Roast
8oz or 250 gr. White Mushrooms, sliced
1 Carrot, diced
1 Onion, diced
1 Celery stalk, diced
1 bunch of Parsley, chopped
1 clove Garlic, pressed
2 Tbsp. or 50 gr. of Butter
Oil
Salt and PepperIf needed, tie the meat, than salt and pepper it.  Add the oil and butter to the pressure cooker, and when melted add the roast.  Turn it several times to completely sear the outside.  Add the carrot, onion and celery and let them soften.  Then, add the parsley and garlic, spreading them evenly on the roast.  Add the sliced mushrooms and 3/4 cups of water (not too much because the mushrooms will release their liquid) and a little more salt and pepper.  Close and lock the lid  and calculate 15 minutes from the whistle for rare with a little blood as I like it (pictured), 17 minutes for medium-rare, and 20 minutes for well-done.  Open the pan and remove the roast beef to a serving plate.  If the mushrooms are still too watery, reduce a bit.  But not too much!Serves 6-8.

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9 Comments

  1. I am very eager to try this recipe (as it looks DELICIOUS!), but am a little apprehensive as the instructions do not specify if you are using a high or low pressure cooker =/ I recently bought a low pressure model & am going to give it a shot! I’ll definitely let you know how it turns out =)

  2. I often feel a little apprehensive to try recipes because in new to PC Cooking and have an electric PC (most recipes seen to bee for stove top). I welcome recommendations for using mine to make this recipe. High vs. low. Quick release or natural. Love beef and mushroom! Thanks!

  3. Tri tip is not a nice cut of meat, and cooking it in the pressure cooker yields a rather tough version of boiled beef, which I personally dislike.

  4. Just tried it with a tri-tip. Wowsers! Juicy, really tasty and cooked just about right, 15 minutes and might be slightly done, pink vice red. It was my first time with a pressure cooker…who knew?!

  5. can the roast be frozen?

  6. I’m guessing the natural release is used in this recipe after the cooking time is up? Apparently all meat joints need the natural release method i.e. take the cooker off the heat, after cooking, and let the pressure drop by itself to avoid the meat tasting “tough”? Is that correct?

    1. Ciao David!

      If you want a rare or medium rare roast do a Normal release. For well done a natural release is best.

      Generally, braised meats (like this recipe) need a natural release – but there are always exceptions to the rule like getting a bloody roast beef.

      I have observed toughness in braised meats during a normal release when all of the meat’s own natural juices quickly evaporate (likely due to the large difference between the meat’s temperature and room temperature). A Natural release, slowly lowers the meat’s temperature so when you open the cooker there is a smaller temperature differential.

      Instead, boiled meats are “protected” by the cooking liquid so the meat itself slowly lowers in temperature as the liquid around it does so it can endure a faster release without any negative effects on the final product.

      L

  7. Thank for the reply about using normal release! I am going to make this tomorrow but was thinking of subbing 1 cup of water with 1 cup of a dry red wine. Thoughts? We have a great 2 lbs piece of rib loin that I’m looking forward to pressure cooking! Hope it turns out rare, I’m going to switch to a lower burner on my electric stove top once it reaches pressure and stick to exactly 15 minutes with normal release.

  8. I tried this in my InstantPot on high. It was delicious! I would never have guessed you can create a medium rare roast in a pressure cooker.

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